skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

Abstract

Surface roughness values for the areas surrounding the H, D and N-Area meteorological towers were computed from archived 2010 meteorological data. These 15-minute-averaged data were measured with cup anemometers and bidirectional wind vanes (bivanes) 61 m above the surface. The results of the roughness calculation using the standard deviation of elevation angle {sigma}{sub E}, and applying the simple formula based on tree canopy height, gave consistent estimates for roughness around the H-Area tower in the range of 1.76 to 1.86 m (95% confidence interval) with a mean value of 1.81 m. Application of the {sigma}{sub E} method for the 61-m level at D and N-Areas gave mean values of 1.71 and 1.81 with confidence ranges of 1.62-1.81 and 1.73-1.88 meters, respectively. Roughness results are azimuth dependent, and thus are presented as averages over compass sectors spanning 22.5 degrees. Calculated values were compared to other methods of determining roughness, including the standard deviation of the azimuth direction, {sigma}{sub A}, and standard deviation of the wind speed, {sigma}{sub U}. Additional data was obtained from a sonic anemometer at 61-m on the H-Area tower during a period of a few weeks in 2010. Results from the sonic anemometer support our use of {sigma}{submore » E} to calculate roughness. Based on the H-Area tower results, a surface roughness of 1.8 m using is recommended for use in dispersion modeling applications that consider the impacts of a contaminant release to individuals along the Site boundary. The canopy surrounding the H-Area tower is relatively uniform (i.e., little variance in roughness by upwind direction), and data supplied by the U.S. Forest Service at Savannah River show that the canopy height and composition surrounding the H-Area tower is reasonably representative of forested areas throughout the SRS reservation. For dispersion modeling analyses requiring assessments of a co-located worker within the respective operations area, recommended area-specific values range from 0.3 m for E Area to 0.7 m for A Area at the Savannah River National Laboratory. These area-specific values, summarized in Table 4-1, were determined using the Environmental Protection Agency's AERSURFACE computer algorithm.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SRS
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1037733
Report Number(s):
SRNL-STI-2012-00016
TRN: US1201757
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC09-08SR22470
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ANEMOMETERS; COMPUTERS; ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION; ROUGHNESS; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; SIMULATION; VANES; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Hunter, C. ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.2172/1037733.
Hunter, C. ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE. United States. doi:10.2172/1037733.
Hunter, C. Wed . "ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE". United States. doi:10.2172/1037733. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1037733.
@article{osti_1037733,
title = {ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE},
author = {Hunter, C.},
abstractNote = {Surface roughness values for the areas surrounding the H, D and N-Area meteorological towers were computed from archived 2010 meteorological data. These 15-minute-averaged data were measured with cup anemometers and bidirectional wind vanes (bivanes) 61 m above the surface. The results of the roughness calculation using the standard deviation of elevation angle {sigma}{sub E}, and applying the simple formula based on tree canopy height, gave consistent estimates for roughness around the H-Area tower in the range of 1.76 to 1.86 m (95% confidence interval) with a mean value of 1.81 m. Application of the {sigma}{sub E} method for the 61-m level at D and N-Areas gave mean values of 1.71 and 1.81 with confidence ranges of 1.62-1.81 and 1.73-1.88 meters, respectively. Roughness results are azimuth dependent, and thus are presented as averages over compass sectors spanning 22.5 degrees. Calculated values were compared to other methods of determining roughness, including the standard deviation of the azimuth direction, {sigma}{sub A}, and standard deviation of the wind speed, {sigma}{sub U}. Additional data was obtained from a sonic anemometer at 61-m on the H-Area tower during a period of a few weeks in 2010. Results from the sonic anemometer support our use of {sigma}{sub E} to calculate roughness. Based on the H-Area tower results, a surface roughness of 1.8 m using is recommended for use in dispersion modeling applications that consider the impacts of a contaminant release to individuals along the Site boundary. The canopy surrounding the H-Area tower is relatively uniform (i.e., little variance in roughness by upwind direction), and data supplied by the U.S. Forest Service at Savannah River show that the canopy height and composition surrounding the H-Area tower is reasonably representative of forested areas throughout the SRS reservation. For dispersion modeling analyses requiring assessments of a co-located worker within the respective operations area, recommended area-specific values range from 0.3 m for E Area to 0.7 m for A Area at the Savannah River National Laboratory. These area-specific values, summarized in Table 4-1, were determined using the Environmental Protection Agency's AERSURFACE computer algorithm.},
doi = {10.2172/1037733},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2012},
month = {Wed Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2012}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • This report has been prepared in response to the request by the House Appropriations Committee to address the permanent isolation and containment/removal of the contaminants associated with the seepage basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Many of the activities regarding groundwater monitoring and status referred to in this report will be discussed in detail in a companion report on the Groundwater Monitoring Program at the SRS (WSRC-RP-89-889). Seepage Basins are broadly defined as excavated, unlined earthen basins designed to receive and store, treat, or recharge various liquid waste streams. Not included in this report are basins containing only non-hazardous,more » non-radioactive constituents, such as ash basins. Fifty-four basins are discussed in this report, forty of which are inactive. Five of the remaining fourteen active basins are coal pile runoff basins, one is an ash basin that also receives coal rejects, and the remaining eight are reactor seepage basins. The Department of Energy--Savannah River (DOE-SR) has notified the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) of its intent to apply for National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permits for the direct discharge of disassembly basin purge water. One the permits are issued the reactor basins will be taken out of service. All of the basins discussed in this report will be remediated under Federal and/or State regulatory environmental programs. 43 figs., 6 tabs.« less
  • During the first five years of its contract with the Department of Energy, Westinghouse Savannah River Company was paid over $130 million in fees to manage and operate the Savannah River Site. Fees paid to Westinghouse steadily increased over the five year period. For example, fees paid for the last six months of this five year period were over three times as large as fees paid for the first six months. The purpose of this inspection was to review the Department`s annual negotiation of total available fees with Westinghouse, and to examine the reasons for the growth in fees overmore » this five year period. The review disclosed that, after Fiscal Year 1989, the Department used an increasing number of fee bases in calculating Westinghouse Savannah River Company`s fixed-fee-equivalents from the maximum fee schedules within the Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation. The authors found that the Department had significantly increased the percentage of the dollar value of subcontracts being placed in Westinghouse`s fee bases for fee calculation purposes. They found that the Department had effectively increased Westinghouse`s fixed-fee-equivalents by approximately $3 million in both Fiscal Year 1993 and 1994 to, in large part, fund an unallowable employee incentive compensation program. They found that Westinghouse`s total paid fees for the five year period increased significantly over what they would have been had the terms resulting from the original competitive negotiations been maintained. The authors recommended that the Deputy Assist Secretary for Procurement and Assistance Management require that changes in either the number or composition of fee bases used in calculating fees from the maximum fee schedules be submitted to the Department`s Procurement Executive for approval.« less
  • Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is responsible for managing and operating the Savannah River Site through a contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE). This responsibility includes providing accounts payable services for processing vendor invoices. The objective of the audit was to determine if refunds received from subcontractors were processed and recorded in accordance with DOE orders. For 6 of 10 refunds, WSRC did not follow the guidance provided by DOE Orders 2200.6 or 2200.4. Specifically, WSRC did not credit the originally charged accounts for the projects or request exception to the DOE orders from the Controller.
  • Cooling water for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) L-Reactor, K-Reactor, and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pumphouses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water. They are passed through the reactor heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70{degree}C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is presumably 100%. Apart from a small pilot study conducted in 1989, ichthyoplankton samples have not been collected from the vicinity of the SRS intake canals since 1985.more » The Department of Energy (DOE) has requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) resume ichthyoplankton sampling for the purpose of assessing entrainment at the SRS Savannah River intakes. This request is due to the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River. The following scope of work presents a sampling plan that will collect information on the spatial and temporal distribution of fish eggs and larvae near the SRS intake canal mouths. This data will be combined with information on water movement patterns near the canal mouths in order to determine the percentage of ichthyoplankton that are removed from the Savannah River by the SRS intakes. The following sampling plan incorporates improvements in experimental design that resulted from the findings of the 1989 pilot study. 1 fig.« less
  • Archaeological investigations on the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina span 17 years and continue today through a cooperative agreement between DOE and the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology (SCIAA), University of South Carolina. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) of SCIAA has been and continues to be the sole archaeological consultant for DOE-SRS. This report documents technical aspects of all prehistoric archaeological research conducted by the SRARP between 1973 and 1987. Further, this report provides interpretative contexts for archaeological resources as a basis for an archaeological resource plan reportedmore » elsewhere (SRARP 1989), and as a comprehensive statement of our current understanding of Native American prehistory. 400 refs., 130 figs., 39 tabs.« less