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Title: Active Flash: Performance-Energy Tradeoffs for Out-of-Core Processing on Non-Volatile Memory Devices

Abstract

In this abstract, we study the performance and energy tradeoffs involved in migrating data analysis into the flash device, a process we refer to as Active Flash. The Active Flash paradigm is similar to 'active disks', which has received considerable attention. Active Flash allows us to move processing closer to data, thereby minimizing data movement costs and reducing power consumption. It enables true out-of-core computation. The conventional definition of out-of-core solvers refers to an approach to process data that is too large to fit in the main memory and, consequently, requires access to disk. However, in Active Flash, processing outside the host CPU literally frees the core and achieves real 'out-of-core' analysis. Moving analysis to data has long been desirable, not just at this level, but at all levels of the system hierarchy. However, this requires a detailed study on the tradeoffs involved in achieving analysis turnaround under an acceptable energy envelope. To this end, we first need to evaluate if there is enough computing power on the flash device to warrant such an exploration. Flash processors require decent computing power to run the internal logic pertaining to the Flash Translation Layer (FTL), which is responsible for operations such asmore » address translation, garbage collection (GC) and wear-leveling. Modern SSDs are composed of multiple packages and several flash chips within a package. The packages are connected using multiple I/O channels to offer high I/O bandwidth. SSD computing power is also expected to be high enough to exploit such inherent internal parallelism within the drive to increase the bandwidth and to handle fast I/O requests. More recently, SSD devices are being equipped with powerful processing units and are even embedded with multicore CPUs (e.g. ARM Cortex-A9 embedded processor is advertised to reach 2GHz frequency and deliver 5000 DMIPS; OCZ RevoDrive X2 SSD has 4 SandForce controllers, each with 780MHz max frequency Tensilica core). Efforts that take advantage of the available computing cycles on the processors on SSDs to run auxiliary tasks other than actual I/O requests are beginning to emerge. Kim et al. investigate database scan operations in the context of processing on the SSDs, and propose dedicated hardware logic to speed up scans. Also, cluster architectures have been explored, which consist of low-power embedded CPUs coupled with small local flash to achieve fast, parallel access to data. Processor utilization on SSD is highly dependent on workloads and, therefore, they can be idle during periods with no I/O accesses. We propose to use the available processing capability on the SSD to run tasks that can be offloaded from the host. This paper makes the following contributions: (1) We have investigated Active Flash and its potential to optimize the total energy cost, including power consumption on the host and the flash device; (2) We have developed analytical models to analyze the performance-energy tradeoffs for Active Flash, by treating the SSD as a blackbox, this is particularly valuable due to the proprietary nature of the SSD internal hardware; and (3) We have enhanced a well-known SSD simulator (from MSR) to implement 'on-the-fly' data compression using Active Flash. Our results provide a window into striking a balance between energy consumption and application performance.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [2]
  1. Northeastern University
  2. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1037136
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proceedings of the 3rd Non-Volatile Memories Workshop, San Diego, CA, USA, 20120403, 20120403
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPRESSION; DATA ANALYSIS; ENERGY ACCOUNTING; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; MEMORY DEVICES; PERFORMANCE; PROCESSING; SIMULATORS; Active Flash

Citation Formats

Boboila, Simona, Kim, Youngjae, Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S, Desnoyers, Peter, and Shipman, Galen M. Active Flash: Performance-Energy Tradeoffs for Out-of-Core Processing on Non-Volatile Memory Devices. United States: N. p., 2012. Web.
Boboila, Simona, Kim, Youngjae, Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S, Desnoyers, Peter, & Shipman, Galen M. Active Flash: Performance-Energy Tradeoffs for Out-of-Core Processing on Non-Volatile Memory Devices. United States.
Boboila, Simona, Kim, Youngjae, Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S, Desnoyers, Peter, and Shipman, Galen M. Sun . "Active Flash: Performance-Energy Tradeoffs for Out-of-Core Processing on Non-Volatile Memory Devices". United States.
@article{osti_1037136,
title = {Active Flash: Performance-Energy Tradeoffs for Out-of-Core Processing on Non-Volatile Memory Devices},
author = {Boboila, Simona and Kim, Youngjae and Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S and Desnoyers, Peter and Shipman, Galen M},
abstractNote = {In this abstract, we study the performance and energy tradeoffs involved in migrating data analysis into the flash device, a process we refer to as Active Flash. The Active Flash paradigm is similar to 'active disks', which has received considerable attention. Active Flash allows us to move processing closer to data, thereby minimizing data movement costs and reducing power consumption. It enables true out-of-core computation. The conventional definition of out-of-core solvers refers to an approach to process data that is too large to fit in the main memory and, consequently, requires access to disk. However, in Active Flash, processing outside the host CPU literally frees the core and achieves real 'out-of-core' analysis. Moving analysis to data has long been desirable, not just at this level, but at all levels of the system hierarchy. However, this requires a detailed study on the tradeoffs involved in achieving analysis turnaround under an acceptable energy envelope. To this end, we first need to evaluate if there is enough computing power on the flash device to warrant such an exploration. Flash processors require decent computing power to run the internal logic pertaining to the Flash Translation Layer (FTL), which is responsible for operations such as address translation, garbage collection (GC) and wear-leveling. Modern SSDs are composed of multiple packages and several flash chips within a package. The packages are connected using multiple I/O channels to offer high I/O bandwidth. SSD computing power is also expected to be high enough to exploit such inherent internal parallelism within the drive to increase the bandwidth and to handle fast I/O requests. More recently, SSD devices are being equipped with powerful processing units and are even embedded with multicore CPUs (e.g. ARM Cortex-A9 embedded processor is advertised to reach 2GHz frequency and deliver 5000 DMIPS; OCZ RevoDrive X2 SSD has 4 SandForce controllers, each with 780MHz max frequency Tensilica core). Efforts that take advantage of the available computing cycles on the processors on SSDs to run auxiliary tasks other than actual I/O requests are beginning to emerge. Kim et al. investigate database scan operations in the context of processing on the SSDs, and propose dedicated hardware logic to speed up scans. Also, cluster architectures have been explored, which consist of low-power embedded CPUs coupled with small local flash to achieve fast, parallel access to data. Processor utilization on SSD is highly dependent on workloads and, therefore, they can be idle during periods with no I/O accesses. We propose to use the available processing capability on the SSD to run tasks that can be offloaded from the host. This paper makes the following contributions: (1) We have investigated Active Flash and its potential to optimize the total energy cost, including power consumption on the host and the flash device; (2) We have developed analytical models to analyze the performance-energy tradeoffs for Active Flash, by treating the SSD as a blackbox, this is particularly valuable due to the proprietary nature of the SSD internal hardware; and (3) We have enhanced a well-known SSD simulator (from MSR) to implement 'on-the-fly' data compression using Active Flash. Our results provide a window into striking a balance between energy consumption and application performance.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {1}
}

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