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Title: Advancing the use of minirhizotrons in wetlands

Abstract

Background: Wetlands store a substantial amount of carbon (C) in deep soil organic matter deposits, and play an important role in global fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane. Fine roots (i.e., ephemeral roots that are active in water and nutrient uptake) are recognized as important components of biogeochemical cycles in nutrient-limited wetland ecosystems. However, quantification of fine-root dynamics in wetlands has generally been limited to destructive approaches, possibly because of methodological difficulties associated with the unique environmental, soil, and plant community characteristics of these systems. Non-destructive minirhizotron technology has rarely been used in wetland ecosystems. Scope: Our goal was to develop a consensus on, and a methodological framework for, the appropriate installation and use of minirhizotron technology in wetland ecosystems. Here, we discuss a number of potential solutions for the challenges associated with the deployment of minirhizotron technology in wetlands, including minirhizotron installation and anchorage, capture and analysis of minirhizotron images, and upscaling of minirhizotron data for analysis of biogeochemical pools and parameterization of land surface models. Conclusions: The appropriate use of minirhizotron technology to examine relatively understudied fine-root dynamics in wetlands will advance our knowledge of ecosystem C and nutrient cycling in these globally important ecosystems.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8]
  1. ORNL
  2. McGill University, Montreal, Quebec
  3. University of California, Riverside
  4. Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
  5. USDA Forest Service
  6. Finnish Forest Research Institute, Parkano, Finland
  7. University of Sheffield
  8. University of Alaska
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1036170
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Plant and Soil
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 352; Journal Issue: 1-2; Journal ID: ISSN 0032-079X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; CARBON; CARBON DIOXIDE; ECOSYSTEMS; METHANE; NUTRIENTS; ORGANIC MATTER; SOILS; WATER; WETLANDS; fine roots; minirhizotron; wetlands; peatlands; methodology

Citation Formats

Iversen, Colleen M, Murphy, Meaghan T., Allen, Michael F., Childs, Joanne, Eissenstat, David M., Lilleskov, Erik A., Sarjala, Tytti M., Sloan, Victoria L., and Sullivan, Patrick F. Advancing the use of minirhizotrons in wetlands. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.1007/s11104-011-0953-1.
Iversen, Colleen M, Murphy, Meaghan T., Allen, Michael F., Childs, Joanne, Eissenstat, David M., Lilleskov, Erik A., Sarjala, Tytti M., Sloan, Victoria L., & Sullivan, Patrick F. Advancing the use of minirhizotrons in wetlands. United States. doi:10.1007/s11104-011-0953-1.
Iversen, Colleen M, Murphy, Meaghan T., Allen, Michael F., Childs, Joanne, Eissenstat, David M., Lilleskov, Erik A., Sarjala, Tytti M., Sloan, Victoria L., and Sullivan, Patrick F. Sun . "Advancing the use of minirhizotrons in wetlands". United States. doi:10.1007/s11104-011-0953-1.
@article{osti_1036170,
title = {Advancing the use of minirhizotrons in wetlands},
author = {Iversen, Colleen M and Murphy, Meaghan T. and Allen, Michael F. and Childs, Joanne and Eissenstat, David M. and Lilleskov, Erik A. and Sarjala, Tytti M. and Sloan, Victoria L. and Sullivan, Patrick F.},
abstractNote = {Background: Wetlands store a substantial amount of carbon (C) in deep soil organic matter deposits, and play an important role in global fluxes of carbon dioxide and methane. Fine roots (i.e., ephemeral roots that are active in water and nutrient uptake) are recognized as important components of biogeochemical cycles in nutrient-limited wetland ecosystems. However, quantification of fine-root dynamics in wetlands has generally been limited to destructive approaches, possibly because of methodological difficulties associated with the unique environmental, soil, and plant community characteristics of these systems. Non-destructive minirhizotron technology has rarely been used in wetland ecosystems. Scope: Our goal was to develop a consensus on, and a methodological framework for, the appropriate installation and use of minirhizotron technology in wetland ecosystems. Here, we discuss a number of potential solutions for the challenges associated with the deployment of minirhizotron technology in wetlands, including minirhizotron installation and anchorage, capture and analysis of minirhizotron images, and upscaling of minirhizotron data for analysis of biogeochemical pools and parameterization of land surface models. Conclusions: The appropriate use of minirhizotron technology to examine relatively understudied fine-root dynamics in wetlands will advance our knowledge of ecosystem C and nutrient cycling in these globally important ecosystems.},
doi = {10.1007/s11104-011-0953-1},
journal = {Plant and Soil},
issn = {0032-079X},
number = 1-2,
volume = 352,
place = {United States},
year = {2012},
month = {1}
}