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Title: Improving the Technical, Environmental, and Social Performance of Wind Energy Systems Using Biomass-Based Energy Storage

Abstract

A completely renewable baseload electricity generation system is proposed by combining wind energy, compressed air energy storage, and biomass gasification. This system can eliminate problems associated with wind intermittency and provide a source of electrical energy functionally equivalent to a large fossil or nuclear power plant. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) can be economically deployed in the Midwestern US, an area with significant low-cost wind resources. CAES systems require a combustible fuel, typically natural gas, which results in fuel price risk and greenhouse gas emissions. Replacing natural gas with synfuel derived from biomass gasification eliminates the use of fossil fuels, virtually eliminating net CO{sub 2} emissions from the system. In addition, by deriving energy completely from farm sources, this type of system may reduce some opposition to long distance transmission lines in rural areas, which may be an obstacle to large-scale wind deployment.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Wind Power Program
OSTI Identifier:
1035716
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-620-38270
Journal ID: ISSN 0960-1481; RNENE3; TRN: US1201179
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Renewable Energy; Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 9; Related Information: Posted with permission
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; 17 WIND ENERGY; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 25 ENERGY STORAGE; BIOMASS; COMPRESSED AIR ENERGY STORAGE; ELECTRICITY; ENERGY STORAGE; ENERGY SYSTEMS; FARMS; FOSSIL FUELS; GASIFICATION; GREENHOUSE GASES; NATURAL GAS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; PERFORMANCE; POWER TRANSMISSION LINES; PRICES; RURAL AREAS; WIND; BIOMASS GASIFICATION; TRANSMISSION; Energy Analysis; Crosscutting; Biomass; Wind and Hydropower Technologies

Citation Formats

Denholm, P. Improving the Technical, Environmental, and Social Performance of Wind Energy Systems Using Biomass-Based Energy Storage. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1016/j.renene.2005.07.001.
Denholm, P. Improving the Technical, Environmental, and Social Performance of Wind Energy Systems Using Biomass-Based Energy Storage. United States. doi:10.1016/j.renene.2005.07.001.
Denholm, P. Sun . "Improving the Technical, Environmental, and Social Performance of Wind Energy Systems Using Biomass-Based Energy Storage". United States. doi:10.1016/j.renene.2005.07.001.
@article{osti_1035716,
title = {Improving the Technical, Environmental, and Social Performance of Wind Energy Systems Using Biomass-Based Energy Storage},
author = {Denholm, P.},
abstractNote = {A completely renewable baseload electricity generation system is proposed by combining wind energy, compressed air energy storage, and biomass gasification. This system can eliminate problems associated with wind intermittency and provide a source of electrical energy functionally equivalent to a large fossil or nuclear power plant. Compressed air energy storage (CAES) can be economically deployed in the Midwestern US, an area with significant low-cost wind resources. CAES systems require a combustible fuel, typically natural gas, which results in fuel price risk and greenhouse gas emissions. Replacing natural gas with synfuel derived from biomass gasification eliminates the use of fossil fuels, virtually eliminating net CO{sub 2} emissions from the system. In addition, by deriving energy completely from farm sources, this type of system may reduce some opposition to long distance transmission lines in rural areas, which may be an obstacle to large-scale wind deployment.},
doi = {10.1016/j.renene.2005.07.001},
journal = {Renewable Energy},
number = 9,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}
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