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Title: Analysis of Uptime Efficiency of the SLC as Measured by Pulse Accounting

Abstract

The repetition frequency of a linear collider can deviate substantially from nominal design values as a result of lost pulses. Pulses are typically lost as a result of a veto imposed by the many machine protection systems (MPSs). A system has been installed at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) to use the existing beam position monitor hardware to count every beam pulse that passes each of the strategic locations. Also counted are the signals from various beam dumpers, as well as trigger signals generated by the MPS. Representative data of SLC running that have been used to determine how to improve running efficiency are shown.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1035129
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-5564
TRN: US201204%%353
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEEE 1991 Particle Accelerator Conference (APS Beam Physics), San Francisco, California, 6-9 May 1991.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; BEAM POSITION; DESIGN; EFFICIENCY; LINEAR COLLIDERS; MONITORS; PHYSICS; STANFORD LINEAR COLLIDER; ACCSYS

Citation Formats

Krejik, P . Analysis of Uptime Efficiency of the SLC as Measured by Pulse Accounting. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Krejik, P . Analysis of Uptime Efficiency of the SLC as Measured by Pulse Accounting. United States.
Krejik, P . Wed . "Analysis of Uptime Efficiency of the SLC as Measured by Pulse Accounting". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1035129,
title = {Analysis of Uptime Efficiency of the SLC as Measured by Pulse Accounting},
author = {Krejik, P .},
abstractNote = {The repetition frequency of a linear collider can deviate substantially from nominal design values as a result of lost pulses. Pulses are typically lost as a result of a veto imposed by the many machine protection systems (MPSs). A system has been installed at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) to use the existing beam position monitor hardware to count every beam pulse that passes each of the strategic locations. Also counted are the signals from various beam dumpers, as well as trigger signals generated by the MPS. Representative data of SLC running that have been used to determine how to improve running efficiency are shown.},
doi = {},
journal = {IEEE 1991 Particle Accelerator Conference (APS Beam Physics), San Francisco, California, 6-9 May 1991.},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 19 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Wed Apr 19 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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