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Title: A comparison of trenched plot techniques for partitioning soil respiration

Abstract

Partitioning the soil surface CO{sub 2} flux (R{sub S}) flux is an important step in understanding ecosystem-level carbon cycling, given that R{sub S} is poorly constrained and its source components may have different responses to climate change. Trenched plots are a classic method of separating the R{sub S} source fluxes, but labor-intensive and may cause considerable disturbance to the soil environment. This study tested if various methods of plant suppression in trenched plots affected R{sub S} fluxes, quantified the R{sub S} response to soil temperature and moisture changes, and estimated the heterotrophic contribution to R{sub S}. It was performed in a boreal black spruce (Picea mariana) plantation, using a complete randomized design, during the 2007 growing season (May-November). Trenched plots had significantly lower R{sub S} than control plots, with differences appearing {approx}100 days after trenching; spatial variability doubled after trenching but then declined throughout the experiment. Most trenching treatments had significantly lower (by {approx}0.5 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) R{sub S} than the controls, and there was no significant difference in R{sub S} among the various trenching treatments. Soil temperature at 2 cm explained more R{sub S} variability than did 10-cm temperature or soil moisture. Temperature sensitivity (Q10) declined inmore » the control plots from {approx}2.6 (at 5 C) to {approx}1.6 (at 15 C); trenched plots values were higher, from 3.1 at 5 C to 1.9 at 15 C. We estimated R{sub S} for the study period to be 241 {+-} 40 g C m{sup -2}, with roots contributing 64% of R{sub S} after accounting for fine root decay, and 293 g C m{sup -2} for the entire year. These findings suggest that laborious hand weeding of vegetation may be usefully replaced by other methods, easing future studies of this large and poorly-understood carbon flux.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1034233
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-76514
Journal ID: ISSN 0038-0717; SBIOAH; KP1703030; TRN: US201203%%455
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Soil Biology and Biochemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 43; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0038-0717
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON; CLIMATES; DECAY; DESIGN; DISTURBANCES; MOISTURE; PLANTS; RESPIRATION; SEASONS; SENSITIVITY; SOILS; SPRUCES; carbon cycling; soil respiration; methodology; boreal forest

Citation Formats

Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin, Bronson, Dustin, Bladyka, Emma, and Gower, Stith T. A comparison of trenched plot techniques for partitioning soil respiration. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2011.06.011.
Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin, Bronson, Dustin, Bladyka, Emma, & Gower, Stith T. A comparison of trenched plot techniques for partitioning soil respiration. United States. doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2011.06.011.
Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin, Bronson, Dustin, Bladyka, Emma, and Gower, Stith T. Sat . "A comparison of trenched plot techniques for partitioning soil respiration". United States. doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2011.06.011.
@article{osti_1034233,
title = {A comparison of trenched plot techniques for partitioning soil respiration},
author = {Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin and Bronson, Dustin and Bladyka, Emma and Gower, Stith T},
abstractNote = {Partitioning the soil surface CO{sub 2} flux (R{sub S}) flux is an important step in understanding ecosystem-level carbon cycling, given that R{sub S} is poorly constrained and its source components may have different responses to climate change. Trenched plots are a classic method of separating the R{sub S} source fluxes, but labor-intensive and may cause considerable disturbance to the soil environment. This study tested if various methods of plant suppression in trenched plots affected R{sub S} fluxes, quantified the R{sub S} response to soil temperature and moisture changes, and estimated the heterotrophic contribution to R{sub S}. It was performed in a boreal black spruce (Picea mariana) plantation, using a complete randomized design, during the 2007 growing season (May-November). Trenched plots had significantly lower R{sub S} than control plots, with differences appearing {approx}100 days after trenching; spatial variability doubled after trenching but then declined throughout the experiment. Most trenching treatments had significantly lower (by {approx}0.5 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) R{sub S} than the controls, and there was no significant difference in R{sub S} among the various trenching treatments. Soil temperature at 2 cm explained more R{sub S} variability than did 10-cm temperature or soil moisture. Temperature sensitivity (Q10) declined in the control plots from {approx}2.6 (at 5 C) to {approx}1.6 (at 15 C); trenched plots values were higher, from 3.1 at 5 C to 1.9 at 15 C. We estimated R{sub S} for the study period to be 241 {+-} 40 g C m{sup -2}, with roots contributing 64% of R{sub S} after accounting for fine root decay, and 293 g C m{sup -2} for the entire year. These findings suggest that laborious hand weeding of vegetation may be usefully replaced by other methods, easing future studies of this large and poorly-understood carbon flux.},
doi = {10.1016/j.soilbio.2011.06.011},
journal = {Soil Biology and Biochemistry},
issn = {0038-0717},
number = 10,
volume = 43,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {7}
}