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Title: Developing Association Mapping in Polyploid Perennial Biofuel Grasses: Final Technical Report

Abstract

This project had six objectives, four of which have been completed: 1) Association panels of diverse populations and linkage populations for switchgrass and reed canarygrass (~1,000 clones each) were assembled and planted in two sites (Ithaca, NY and Arlington, WI); 2) Key biofeedstock characteristics were evaluated in these panels for three field seasons; 3) High density SNP markers were developed in switchgrass; and 4) Switchgrass association panels and linkage populations were genotyped. The remaining two original objectives will be met in the next year, as the analyses are completed and papers published: 5) Switchgrass population structure and germplasm diversity will be evaluated; and 6) Association mapping will be established and marker based breeding values estimated in switchgrass. We also completed a study of the chromosome-number variation found in switchgrass.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDA-ARS, Ithaca, NY
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1033499
Report Number(s):
DOE07ER64454-1
DOE Contract Number:
AI02-07ER64454
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS

Citation Formats

Buckler, Edward S, Casler, Michael D, and Cherney, Jerome H. Developing Association Mapping in Polyploid Perennial Biofuel Grasses: Final Technical Report. United States: N. p., 2012. Web. doi:10.2172/1033499.
Buckler, Edward S, Casler, Michael D, & Cherney, Jerome H. Developing Association Mapping in Polyploid Perennial Biofuel Grasses: Final Technical Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1033499.
Buckler, Edward S, Casler, Michael D, and Cherney, Jerome H. Fri . "Developing Association Mapping in Polyploid Perennial Biofuel Grasses: Final Technical Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1033499. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1033499.
@article{osti_1033499,
title = {Developing Association Mapping in Polyploid Perennial Biofuel Grasses: Final Technical Report},
author = {Buckler, Edward S and Casler, Michael D and Cherney, Jerome H},
abstractNote = {This project had six objectives, four of which have been completed: 1) Association panels of diverse populations and linkage populations for switchgrass and reed canarygrass (~1,000 clones each) were assembled and planted in two sites (Ithaca, NY and Arlington, WI); 2) Key biofeedstock characteristics were evaluated in these panels for three field seasons; 3) High density SNP markers were developed in switchgrass; and 4) Switchgrass association panels and linkage populations were genotyped. The remaining two original objectives will be met in the next year, as the analyses are completed and papers published: 5) Switchgrass population structure and germplasm diversity will be evaluated; and 6) Association mapping will be established and marker based breeding values estimated in switchgrass. We also completed a study of the chromosome-number variation found in switchgrass.},
doi = {10.2172/1033499},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2012},
month = {Fri Jan 20 00:00:00 EST 2012}
}

Technical Report:

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