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Title: Beam Dynamics Study of X-Band Linac Driven X-Ray FELS

Abstract

Several linac driven X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) are being developed to provide high brightness photon beams with very short, tunable wavelengths. In this paper, three XFEL configurations are proposed that achieve LCLS-like performance using X-band linac drivers. These linacs are more versatile, efficient and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. For each of the designs, the overall accelerator layout and the shaping of the bunch longitudinal phase space are described briefly. During the last 40 years, the photon wavelengths from linac driven FELs have been pushed shorter by increasing the electron beam energy and adopting shorter period undulators. Recently, the wavelengths have reached the X-ray range, with FLASH (Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg) and LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) successfully providing users with soft and hard X-rays, respectively. FLASH uses a 1.2 GeV L-band (1.3 GHz) superconducting linac driver and can deliver 10-70 fs FWHM long photon pulses in a wavelength range of 44 nm to 4.1 nm. LCLS uses the last third of the SLAC 3 km S-band (2.856 GHz) normal-conducting linac to produce 3.5 GeV to 15 GeV bunches to generate soft and hard X-rays with good spatial coherence at wavelengths from 2.2 nm tomore » 0.12 nm. Newer XFELs (at Spring8 and PSI) use C-band (5.7 GHz) normal-conducting linac drivers, which can sustain higher acceleration gradients, and hence shorten the linac length, and are more efficient at converting rf energy to bunch energy. The X-band (11.4 GHz) rf technology developed for NLC/GLC offers even higher gradients and efficiencies, and the shorter rf wavelength allows more versatility in longitudinal bunch phase space compression and manipulation. In the following sections, three different configurations of X-band linac driven XFELs are described that operate from 6 to 14 GeV. The first (LOW CHARGE DESIGN) has an electron bunch charge of only 10 pC; the second (OPTICS LINEARIZATION DESIGN) is based on optics linearization of the longitudinal phase space in the first stage bunch compressor and can operate with either a high (250 pC) or low (20 pC) bunch charge; and the third (LCLS INJECTOR DESIGN) is similar to LCLS but uses an X-band linac after the first stage bunch compressor at 250 MeV to achieve a final beam energy up to 14 GeV. Compared with LCLS, these X-band linacs are at least a factor of three shorter.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1032762
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-14570
TRN: US1200554
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Conference
Journal Name:
Conf.Proc.C110904:3130-3132,2011
Additional Journal Information:
Conference: Presented at the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference (IPAC-2011), San Sebastian, Spain, 4-9 Sep 2011
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATION; ACCELERATORS; BEAM DYNAMICS; BRIGHTNESS; COMPRESSION; COMPRESSORS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRONS; FREE ELECTRON LASERS; LASERS; LIGHT SOURCES; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; OPTICS; PHASE SPACE; PHOTON BEAMS; PHOTONS; STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER; WAVELENGTHS; WIGGLER MAGNETS; Accelerators,ACCPHY

Citation Formats

Adolphsen, C., Limborg-Deprey, C., Raubenheimer, T.O., Wu, J., /SLAC, Sun, Y., and /SLAC. Beam Dynamics Study of X-Band Linac Driven X-Ray FELS. United States: N. p., 2011. Web.
Adolphsen, C., Limborg-Deprey, C., Raubenheimer, T.O., Wu, J., /SLAC, Sun, Y., & /SLAC. Beam Dynamics Study of X-Band Linac Driven X-Ray FELS. United States.
Adolphsen, C., Limborg-Deprey, C., Raubenheimer, T.O., Wu, J., /SLAC, Sun, Y., and /SLAC. Tue . "Beam Dynamics Study of X-Band Linac Driven X-Ray FELS". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1032762.
@article{osti_1032762,
title = {Beam Dynamics Study of X-Band Linac Driven X-Ray FELS},
author = {Adolphsen, C. and Limborg-Deprey, C. and Raubenheimer, T.O. and Wu, J. and /SLAC and Sun, Y. and /SLAC},
abstractNote = {Several linac driven X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFELs) are being developed to provide high brightness photon beams with very short, tunable wavelengths. In this paper, three XFEL configurations are proposed that achieve LCLS-like performance using X-band linac drivers. These linacs are more versatile, efficient and compact than ones using S-band or C-band rf technology. For each of the designs, the overall accelerator layout and the shaping of the bunch longitudinal phase space are described briefly. During the last 40 years, the photon wavelengths from linac driven FELs have been pushed shorter by increasing the electron beam energy and adopting shorter period undulators. Recently, the wavelengths have reached the X-ray range, with FLASH (Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg) and LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) successfully providing users with soft and hard X-rays, respectively. FLASH uses a 1.2 GeV L-band (1.3 GHz) superconducting linac driver and can deliver 10-70 fs FWHM long photon pulses in a wavelength range of 44 nm to 4.1 nm. LCLS uses the last third of the SLAC 3 km S-band (2.856 GHz) normal-conducting linac to produce 3.5 GeV to 15 GeV bunches to generate soft and hard X-rays with good spatial coherence at wavelengths from 2.2 nm to 0.12 nm. Newer XFELs (at Spring8 and PSI) use C-band (5.7 GHz) normal-conducting linac drivers, which can sustain higher acceleration gradients, and hence shorten the linac length, and are more efficient at converting rf energy to bunch energy. The X-band (11.4 GHz) rf technology developed for NLC/GLC offers even higher gradients and efficiencies, and the shorter rf wavelength allows more versatility in longitudinal bunch phase space compression and manipulation. In the following sections, three different configurations of X-band linac driven XFELs are described that operate from 6 to 14 GeV. The first (LOW CHARGE DESIGN) has an electron bunch charge of only 10 pC; the second (OPTICS LINEARIZATION DESIGN) is based on optics linearization of the longitudinal phase space in the first stage bunch compressor and can operate with either a high (250 pC) or low (20 pC) bunch charge; and the third (LCLS INJECTOR DESIGN) is similar to LCLS but uses an X-band linac after the first stage bunch compressor at 250 MeV to achieve a final beam energy up to 14 GeV. Compared with LCLS, these X-band linacs are at least a factor of three shorter.},
doi = {},
journal = {Conf.Proc.C110904:3130-3132,2011},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {12}
}

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