skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Biological Sciences for the 21st Century: Meeting the Challenges of Sustainable Development in an Era of Global Change

Abstract

The symposium was held 10-12 May, 2007 at the Capitol Hilton Hotel in Washington, D. C. The 30 talks explored how some of today's key biological research developments (such as biocomplexity and complex systems analysis, bioinformatics and computational biology, the expansion of molecular and genomics research, and the emergence of other comprehensive or system wide analyses, such as proteomics) contribute to sustainability science. The symposium therefore emphasized the challenges facing agriculture, human health, sustainable energy, and the maintenance of ecosystems and their services, so as to provide a focus and a suite of examples of the enormous potential contributions arising from these new developments in the biological sciences. This symposium was the first to provide a venue for exploring how the ongoing advances in the biological sciences together with new approaches for improving knowledge integration and institutional science capacity address key global challenges to sustainability. The speakers presented new research findings, and identified new approaches and needs in biological research that can be expected to have substantial impacts on sustainability science.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Institute of Biological Sciences; National Academy of Sciences, Board on International Scientific Organizations (BISO)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE: Office of Biological & Environmental Research (BER); DOE/Office of Science Technical Program Manager Contact. Dr. Daniel Drell, 301-903-4742, daniel.drell@science.doe.gov
OSTI Identifier:
1032494
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/64425
TRN: US201203%%192
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-07ER64425
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AGRICULTURE; BIOLOGY; CAPACITY; ECOSYSTEMS; MAINTENANCE; SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT; SYSTEMS ANALYSIS; Sustainable Development, Global Change, Ecosystem Services, Food Security, Agriculture, Human Health, Energy

Citation Formats

Joel Cracraft, and Richard O'Grady. Biological Sciences for the 21st Century: Meeting the Challenges of Sustainable Development in an Era of Global Change. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.2172/1032494.
Joel Cracraft, & Richard O'Grady. Biological Sciences for the 21st Century: Meeting the Challenges of Sustainable Development in an Era of Global Change. United States. doi:10.2172/1032494.
Joel Cracraft, and Richard O'Grady. Sat . "Biological Sciences for the 21st Century: Meeting the Challenges of Sustainable Development in an Era of Global Change". United States. doi:10.2172/1032494. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1032494.
@article{osti_1032494,
title = {Biological Sciences for the 21st Century: Meeting the Challenges of Sustainable Development in an Era of Global Change},
author = {Joel Cracraft and Richard O'Grady},
abstractNote = {The symposium was held 10-12 May, 2007 at the Capitol Hilton Hotel in Washington, D. C. The 30 talks explored how some of today's key biological research developments (such as biocomplexity and complex systems analysis, bioinformatics and computational biology, the expansion of molecular and genomics research, and the emergence of other comprehensive or system wide analyses, such as proteomics) contribute to sustainability science. The symposium therefore emphasized the challenges facing agriculture, human health, sustainable energy, and the maintenance of ecosystems and their services, so as to provide a focus and a suite of examples of the enormous potential contributions arising from these new developments in the biological sciences. This symposium was the first to provide a venue for exploring how the ongoing advances in the biological sciences together with new approaches for improving knowledge integration and institutional science capacity address key global challenges to sustainability. The speakers presented new research findings, and identified new approaches and needs in biological research that can be expected to have substantial impacts on sustainability science.},
doi = {10.2172/1032494},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat May 12 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sat May 12 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • To assess the current status of the chemical sciences through a series of workshops.
  • The Electricity Technology Roadmap represents a collective vision of the opportunities for electricity to serve society in the 21st century through advances in science and technology. It is intended to be periodically updated. The Electricity Technology Roadmap initiative began in 1997. Although it was spearheaded by EPRI, over 200 organizations contributed to an initial report in 1999. It was organized around five Destinations that are critical milestones on the path toward achieving a sustainable global energy economy by 2050. These Destinations are: (1) Strengthening the Power Delivery Infrastructure, (2) Enabling the Digital Society, (3) Boosting Economic Productivity and Prosperity, (4)more » Resolving the Energy/Environment Conflict, and (5) Managing the Global Sustainability Challenge. This 2003 Roadmap edition begins the more detailed planning needed to 'build the road' to reach these five Destinations. A formal effort to expand and extend the Roadmap began in early 2002. Teams worked on 14 broad 'Limiting Challenges' that require technical breakthroughs to meet society's requirements for electricity and electricity-based services in the new century. This work included laying out specific research and development programs to address the 'critical capability gaps' in knowledge and technology for each of the Limiting Challenges. This report is a summary and synthesis of the research described by the various Roadmap teams. It draws out the major conclusions and puts forward a set of priorities and recommendations for accelerating electricity-based R&D in the United States and around the world. It also links to a number of EPRI overview reports of strategic significance, such as the 2003 report titled 'Electricity Sector Framework for the Future,' which is also available on www.epri.com.« less
  • This presentation proposes proposes that environmental justice and sustainable development represent the most significant challenges facing environmental professionals during the next 20 years. It will explore the linkages and tensions between these two emerging fields of research and application, as well as their implications for the environmental professions. Questions addressed will include: (1) What is the conceptual link between these ideas? (2) If cost-benefit analysis, taking, and unfunded mandates are the Republican Congress`s top environmental priorities, what do these issues mean from the perspectives of environmental justice and sustainability? (3) What do the justice and sustainability perspectives imply for themore » future direction of environmental research and advocacy?« less
  • The workshop aimed to identify outstanding climate change science questions and the observational strategies for addressing them. The scientific focus was clouds, aerosols, and precipitation, and the required ground- and aerial-based observations. The workshop findings will be useful input for setting priorities within the Department of Energy (DOE) and the participating European centers. This joint workshop was envisioned as the first step in enhancing the collaboration among these climate research activities needed to better serve the science community.
  • This report provides a comprehensive review of initiatives for promoting sustainable development. It examines various ways in which job retention and creation can be promoted through initiatives that reduce or eliminate environmental burdens and increase or enhance environmental benefits. It lays out a framework for thinking about the ways in which public- and private-sector decisions may contribute to or detract from sustainable development goals. Chapter One provides a view of the contemporary context within which have emerged domestic demands for sustainable development. Chapter Two and Three examine the degrees to which environmental technologies provide important opportunities for economic growth, jobmore » retention, and economically distressed communities. The review of dozens of sustainability initiatives around the country in Chapter Four reveals the degree to which diverse sectors of the economy are involved in pursuing more sustainable modes of economic development. Often these initiatives involve partnerships between the private, public, and nonprofit sectors. Initiatives are underway throughout the country that involve manufacturing products, promoting economic development, improving land use and strengthening communities, developing human resources, changing consumption, and redirecting investments.« less