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Title: Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet) (in Chinese; English)

Abstract

Chinese translation of ITP fact sheet about installing Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces. For most fuel-fired heating equipment, a large amount of the heat supplied is wasted as exhaust or flue gases. In furnaces, air and fuel are mixed and burned to generate heat, some of which is transferred to the heating device and its load. When the heat transfer reaches its practical limit, the spent combustion gases are removed from the furnace via a flue or stack. At this point, these gases still hold considerable thermal energy. In many systems, this is the greatest single heat loss. The energy efficiency can often be increased by using waste heat gas recovery systems to capture and use some of the energy in the flue gas. For natural gas-based systems, the amount of heat contained in the flue gases as a percentage of the heat input in a heating system can be estimated by using Figure 1. Exhaust gas loss or waste heat depends on flue gas temperature and its mass flow, or in practical terms, excess air resulting from combustion air supply and air leakage into the furnace. The excess air can be estimated by measuring oxygen percentage inmore » the flue gases.« less

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Industrial Technologies Program
OSTI Identifier:
1032387
Report Number(s):
DOE/GO-102011-3431
TRN: US201202%%374
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
Chinese; English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 42 ENGINEERING; AIR; AVAILABILITY; COMBUSTION; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; FLUE GAS; FURNACES; GASES; HEAT TRANSFER; HEATING; HEATING SYSTEMS; OXYGEN; WASTE HEAT; CHINESE; WASTE HEAT RECOVERY SYSTEMS; FUEL-FIRED FURNACES; INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM; Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

Citation Formats

Not Available. Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet). United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.2172/1032387.
Not Available. Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet). United States. doi:10.2172/1032387.
Not Available. Sat . "Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)". United States. doi:10.2172/1032387. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1032387.
@article{osti_1032387,
title = {Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {Chinese translation of ITP fact sheet about installing Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces. For most fuel-fired heating equipment, a large amount of the heat supplied is wasted as exhaust or flue gases. In furnaces, air and fuel are mixed and burned to generate heat, some of which is transferred to the heating device and its load. When the heat transfer reaches its practical limit, the spent combustion gases are removed from the furnace via a flue or stack. At this point, these gases still hold considerable thermal energy. In many systems, this is the greatest single heat loss. The energy efficiency can often be increased by using waste heat gas recovery systems to capture and use some of the energy in the flue gas. For natural gas-based systems, the amount of heat contained in the flue gases as a percentage of the heat input in a heating system can be estimated by using Figure 1. Exhaust gas loss or waste heat depends on flue gas temperature and its mass flow, or in practical terms, excess air resulting from combustion air supply and air leakage into the furnace. The excess air can be estimated by measuring oxygen percentage in the flue gases.},
doi = {10.2172/1032387},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {10}
}

Technical Report:

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