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Title: The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS): Science Highlights

Abstract

The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS), a future gamma-ray telescope consisting of an array of {approx}50 atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes distributed over an area of {approx}1 km{sup 2}, will provide a powerful new tool for exploring the high-energy universe. The order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity and improved angular resolution could provide the first detailed images of {gamma}-ray emission from other nearby galaxies or galaxy clusters. The large effective area will provide unprecedented sensitivity to short transients (such as flares from AGNs and GRBs) probing both intrinsic spectral variability (revealing the details of the acceleration mechanism and geometry) as well as constraining the high-energy dispersion in the velocity of light (probing the structure of spacetime and Lorentz invariance). A wide field of view ({approx}4 times that of current instruments) and excellent angular resolution (several times better than current instruments) will allow for an unprecedented survey of the Galactic plane, providing a deep unobscured survey of SNRs, X-ray binaries, pulsar-wind nebulae, molecular cloud complexes and other sources. The differential flux sensitivity of {approx}10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} will rival the most sensitive X-ray instruments for these extended Galactic sources. The excellent capabilities of AGIS at energies below 100 GeV will provide sensitivitymore » to AGN and GRBs out to cosmological redshifts, increasing the number of AGNs detected at high energies from about 20 to more than 100, permitting population studies that will provide valuable insights into both a unified model for AGN and a detailed measurement of the effects of intergalactic absorption from the diffuse extragalactic background light. A new instrument with fast-slewing wide-field telescopes could provide detections of a number of long-duration GRBs providing important physical constraints from this new spectral component. The new array will also have excellent background rejection and very large effective area, providing the very high sensitivity needed to detect emission from dark matter annihilation in Galactic substructure or nearby Dwarf spheroidal galaxies.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1029917
Report Number(s):
SLAC-REPRINT-2011-077
Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X; APCPCS; TRN: US1105866
DOE Contract Number:  
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
AIP Conference Proceedings
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 1085; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0094-243X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; ABSORPTION; ACCELERATION; ANNIHILATION; CLOUDS; GALAXIES; GALAXY CLUSTERS; GEOMETRY; NEBULAE; NONLUMINOUS MATTER; RESOLUTION; SENSITIVITY; SPACE-TIME; TELESCOPES; TRANSIENTS; UNIFIED MODEL; UNIVERSE; VELOCITY; Instrumentation,ASTRO

Citation Formats

Buckley, J, /Washington U., St. Louis, Coppi, P, /Yale U., Digel, S, /SLAC, Funk, S, /SLAC, Krawczynski, H, /Washington U., St. Louis, Krennrich, F, /Iowa State U., Pohl, M, /Iowa State U., Romani, R, /Stanford U., Phys. Dept., Vassiliev, V, and /UCLA. The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS): Science Highlights. United States: N. p., 2011. Web.
Buckley, J, /Washington U., St. Louis, Coppi, P, /Yale U., Digel, S, /SLAC, Funk, S, /SLAC, Krawczynski, H, /Washington U., St. Louis, Krennrich, F, /Iowa State U., Pohl, M, /Iowa State U., Romani, R, /Stanford U., Phys. Dept., Vassiliev, V, & /UCLA. The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS): Science Highlights. United States.
Buckley, J, /Washington U., St. Louis, Coppi, P, /Yale U., Digel, S, /SLAC, Funk, S, /SLAC, Krawczynski, H, /Washington U., St. Louis, Krennrich, F, /Iowa State U., Pohl, M, /Iowa State U., Romani, R, /Stanford U., Phys. Dept., Vassiliev, V, and /UCLA. Mon . "The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS): Science Highlights". United States.
@article{osti_1029917,
title = {The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS): Science Highlights},
author = {Buckley, J and /Washington U., St. Louis and Coppi, P and /Yale U. and Digel, S and /SLAC and Funk, S and /SLAC and Krawczynski, H and /Washington U., St. Louis and Krennrich, F and /Iowa State U. and Pohl, M and /Iowa State U. and Romani, R and /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. and Vassiliev, V and /UCLA},
abstractNote = {The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS), a future gamma-ray telescope consisting of an array of {approx}50 atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes distributed over an area of {approx}1 km{sup 2}, will provide a powerful new tool for exploring the high-energy universe. The order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity and improved angular resolution could provide the first detailed images of {gamma}-ray emission from other nearby galaxies or galaxy clusters. The large effective area will provide unprecedented sensitivity to short transients (such as flares from AGNs and GRBs) probing both intrinsic spectral variability (revealing the details of the acceleration mechanism and geometry) as well as constraining the high-energy dispersion in the velocity of light (probing the structure of spacetime and Lorentz invariance). A wide field of view ({approx}4 times that of current instruments) and excellent angular resolution (several times better than current instruments) will allow for an unprecedented survey of the Galactic plane, providing a deep unobscured survey of SNRs, X-ray binaries, pulsar-wind nebulae, molecular cloud complexes and other sources. The differential flux sensitivity of {approx}10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} will rival the most sensitive X-ray instruments for these extended Galactic sources. The excellent capabilities of AGIS at energies below 100 GeV will provide sensitivity to AGN and GRBs out to cosmological redshifts, increasing the number of AGNs detected at high energies from about 20 to more than 100, permitting population studies that will provide valuable insights into both a unified model for AGN and a detailed measurement of the effects of intergalactic absorption from the diffuse extragalactic background light. A new instrument with fast-slewing wide-field telescopes could provide detections of a number of long-duration GRBs providing important physical constraints from this new spectral component. The new array will also have excellent background rejection and very large effective area, providing the very high sensitivity needed to detect emission from dark matter annihilation in Galactic substructure or nearby Dwarf spheroidal galaxies.},
doi = {},
journal = {AIP Conference Proceedings},
issn = {0094-243X},
number = 1,
volume = 1085,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {11}
}