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Title: Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

Abstract

Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem tomore » contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the second one following the Berkeley Summer Program taken place in June of 2009. This program at BNL focused on theory and had many presentations on a wide range of theoretical aspects on nucleon spin, from perturbative-QCD calculations to models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. It also had a good number of summary talks from all major experimental collaborations on spin physics. The program facilitated many discussions between theorists as well as experimentalists. With five transparencies from each presentation at the Summer Program, this proceedings provides a valuable summary on the status and progress, as well as the future prospects of spin physics.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Riken BNL Research Center
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE - OFFICE OF SCIENCE
OSTI Identifier:
1029246
Report Number(s):
BNL-96163-2011
KD0201; TRN: US1200018
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Brookhven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics; Physics Dept., Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973; 20100714 through 20100727
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; BNL; DEEP INELASTIC SCATTERING; ELECTRONS; FORM FACTORS; GLUONS; HADRONS; MUONS; NUCLEONS; PHASE SPACE; PHYSICS; PROTONS; QUARK MODEL; QUARKS; SCATTERING; SPIN; riken bnl research center

Citation Formats

Aschenauer, A, Qiu, Jianwei, Vogelsang, W, and Yuan, F. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.2172/1029246.
Aschenauer, A, Qiu, Jianwei, Vogelsang, W, & Yuan, F. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics. United States. doi:10.2172/1029246.
Aschenauer, A, Qiu, Jianwei, Vogelsang, W, and Yuan, F. Tue . "Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics". United States. doi:10.2172/1029246. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1029246.
@article{osti_1029246,
title = {Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics},
author = {Aschenauer, A and Qiu, Jianwei and Vogelsang, W and Yuan, F},
abstractNote = {Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the second one following the Berkeley Summer Program taken place in June of 2009. This program at BNL focused on theory and had many presentations on a wide range of theoretical aspects on nucleon spin, from perturbative-QCD calculations to models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. It also had a good number of summary talks from all major experimental collaborations on spin physics. The program facilitated many discussions between theorists as well as experimentalists. With five transparencies from each presentation at the Summer Program, this proceedings provides a valuable summary on the status and progress, as well as the future prospects of spin physics.},
doi = {10.2172/1029246},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {8}
}

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