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Title: Summary of Uranium Solubility Studies in Concrete Waste Forms and Vadose Zone Environments

Abstract

One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. The current plan for waste isolation consists of stacking low-level waste packages on a trench floor, surrounding the stacks with reinforced steel, and encasing these packages in concrete. These concrete-encased waste stacks are expected to vary in size with maximum dimensions of 6.4 m long, 2.7 m wide, and 4 m high. The waste stacks are expected to have a surrounding minimum thickness of 15 cm of concrete encasement. These concrete-encased waste packages are expected to withstand environmental exposure (solar radiation, temperature variations, and precipitation) until an interim soil cover or permanent closure cover is installed and to remain largely intact thereafter. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. This report presents the results of investigations elucidating the uranium mineral phases controlling the long-term fate of uranium within concrete waste forms and the solubility of these phases in concrete pore waters and alkaline, circum-neutral vadose zone environments.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1028569
Report Number(s):
PNNL-20726
830403000; TRN: US1106018
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; CLOSURES; CONCRETES; DIMENSIONS; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE; LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; PRECIPITATION; RADIOISOTOPES; SOILS; SOLUBILITY; THICKNESS; URANIUM; URANIUM MINERALS; WASTE FORMS; WASTES; WATER INFLUX

Citation Formats

Golovich, Elizabeth C., Wellman, Dawn M., Serne, R. Jeffrey, and Bovaird, Chase C. Summary of Uranium Solubility Studies in Concrete Waste Forms and Vadose Zone Environments. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.2172/1028569.
Golovich, Elizabeth C., Wellman, Dawn M., Serne, R. Jeffrey, & Bovaird, Chase C. Summary of Uranium Solubility Studies in Concrete Waste Forms and Vadose Zone Environments. United States. doi:10.2172/1028569.
Golovich, Elizabeth C., Wellman, Dawn M., Serne, R. Jeffrey, and Bovaird, Chase C. Fri . "Summary of Uranium Solubility Studies in Concrete Waste Forms and Vadose Zone Environments". United States. doi:10.2172/1028569. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1028569.
@article{osti_1028569,
title = {Summary of Uranium Solubility Studies in Concrete Waste Forms and Vadose Zone Environments},
author = {Golovich, Elizabeth C. and Wellman, Dawn M. and Serne, R. Jeffrey and Bovaird, Chase C.},
abstractNote = {One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and act as an intrusion barrier. The current plan for waste isolation consists of stacking low-level waste packages on a trench floor, surrounding the stacks with reinforced steel, and encasing these packages in concrete. These concrete-encased waste stacks are expected to vary in size with maximum dimensions of 6.4 m long, 2.7 m wide, and 4 m high. The waste stacks are expected to have a surrounding minimum thickness of 15 cm of concrete encasement. These concrete-encased waste packages are expected to withstand environmental exposure (solar radiation, temperature variations, and precipitation) until an interim soil cover or permanent closure cover is installed and to remain largely intact thereafter. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. This report presents the results of investigations elucidating the uranium mineral phases controlling the long-term fate of uranium within concrete waste forms and the solubility of these phases in concrete pore waters and alkaline, circum-neutral vadose zone environments.},
doi = {10.2172/1028569},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {9}
}

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