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Title: Near-Zero-Energy Homes Help Electric Utilities Meet Record System Peaks

Abstract

Five near zero energy houses (ZEH) are under test at an energy research park near Oak Ridge, TN. Data from 2006-2007 show that these homes have {approx}7 kW lower summer peak electric demand than typical conventional homes in the same region. Combining 17,000 such homes in a 'zero energy neighbourhood' could provide a utility with peak demand management capability equivalent to a 120 MW power plant.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Building Technologies Research and Integration Center
Sponsoring Org.:
Work for Others (WFO)
OSTI Identifier:
1025815
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Newsletter - IEA Heat Pump Center; Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; MANAGEMENT; POWER PLANTS; ENERGY CONSERVATION; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; HOUSES

Citation Formats

Christian, Jeffrey E. Near-Zero-Energy Homes Help Electric Utilities Meet Record System Peaks. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Christian, Jeffrey E. Near-Zero-Energy Homes Help Electric Utilities Meet Record System Peaks. United States.
Christian, Jeffrey E. Mon . "Near-Zero-Energy Homes Help Electric Utilities Meet Record System Peaks". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1025815,
title = {Near-Zero-Energy Homes Help Electric Utilities Meet Record System Peaks},
author = {Christian, Jeffrey E},
abstractNote = {Five near zero energy houses (ZEH) are under test at an energy research park near Oak Ridge, TN. Data from 2006-2007 show that these homes have {approx}7 kW lower summer peak electric demand than typical conventional homes in the same region. Combining 17,000 such homes in a 'zero energy neighbourhood' could provide a utility with peak demand management capability equivalent to a 120 MW power plant.},
doi = {},
journal = {Newsletter - IEA Heat Pump Center},
number = 4,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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