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Title: ePLAS Development for Jet Modeling and Applications

Abstract

Plasma jets provide an alternate approach to the creation of high energy density laboratory plasmas (HEDLP). For the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), typically 30 partially ionized argon jets, produced with mini-rail guns, will be focused into a central volume for subsequent magnetic compression into high density plasma liners that can reach high (0.1 Mbar) peak pressures upon stagnation. The jets are typically 2.5 cm in radius traveling at Mach number 30. Ultimate success will require optimized tuning of the rail configurations, the nozzles injecting the gases, and the careful implementation of pre-ionization. The modeling of plasma jet transport is particularly challenging, due the large space (100 sq cm) and time scales (microseconds) involved. Even traditional implicit methods are insufficient, due to the usual need to track electrons explicitly on the mesh. Wall emission and chemistry must be managed, as must ionization of the jet plasma. Ions in the jets are best followed as particles to account properly for collisions upon jet merger. This Phase I Project developed the code ePLAS to attack and successfully surmount many of these challenges. It invented a new 'super implicit' electromagnetic scheme, using implicit electron moment currents that allowed for modeling of jets over multi-cmmore » and multi-picoseconds on standard, single processor 2 GHz PCs. It enabled merger studies of two jets, in preparation for the multi-jet merger problem. The Project explored particle modeling for the ions, and prepared for the future addition of a grid-base jet ion collision model. Access was added to tabular equations of state for the study of ionization effects in merging jets. The improved code was discussed at the primary plasma meetings (IEEE and APS) during the Project period. Collaborations with National Laboratory and industrial partners were nurtured. Code improvements were made to facilitate code use. See: http://www.researchapplicationscorp.com. The ePLAS code enjoys EAR99 export control treatment, permitting distribution to most foreign countries without a license.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Research Applications Corporation, 148 Piedra Loop, Los Alamos, NM 87544
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1023768
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC0004207
TRN: US1202104
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0004207
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 97 MATHEMATICAL METHODS AND COMPUTING; ARGON; CHEMISTRY; ELECTRONS; ENERGY DENSITY; EQUATIONS OF STATE; EXPORTS; GASES; IMPLEMENTATION; ION COLLISIONS; IONIZATION; LINERS; MACH NUMBER; MAGNETIC COMPRESSION; NOZZLES; PLASMA; PLASMA JETS; STAGNATION; TRANSPORT; TUNING; Plasma jets & modeling, magneto-inertial fusion, implicit/hybrid codes, fusion power.

Citation Formats

Mason, Rodney J. ePLAS Development for Jet Modeling and Applications. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.2172/1023768.
Mason, Rodney J. ePLAS Development for Jet Modeling and Applications. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1023768
Mason, Rodney J. 2011. "ePLAS Development for Jet Modeling and Applications". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1023768. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1023768.
@article{osti_1023768,
title = {ePLAS Development for Jet Modeling and Applications},
author = {Mason, Rodney J},
abstractNote = {Plasma jets provide an alternate approach to the creation of high energy density laboratory plasmas (HEDLP). For the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), typically 30 partially ionized argon jets, produced with mini-rail guns, will be focused into a central volume for subsequent magnetic compression into high density plasma liners that can reach high (0.1 Mbar) peak pressures upon stagnation. The jets are typically 2.5 cm in radius traveling at Mach number 30. Ultimate success will require optimized tuning of the rail configurations, the nozzles injecting the gases, and the careful implementation of pre-ionization. The modeling of plasma jet transport is particularly challenging, due the large space (100 sq cm) and time scales (microseconds) involved. Even traditional implicit methods are insufficient, due to the usual need to track electrons explicitly on the mesh. Wall emission and chemistry must be managed, as must ionization of the jet plasma. Ions in the jets are best followed as particles to account properly for collisions upon jet merger. This Phase I Project developed the code ePLAS to attack and successfully surmount many of these challenges. It invented a new 'super implicit' electromagnetic scheme, using implicit electron moment currents that allowed for modeling of jets over multi-cm and multi-picoseconds on standard, single processor 2 GHz PCs. It enabled merger studies of two jets, in preparation for the multi-jet merger problem. The Project explored particle modeling for the ions, and prepared for the future addition of a grid-base jet ion collision model. Access was added to tabular equations of state for the study of ionization effects in merging jets. The improved code was discussed at the primary plasma meetings (IEEE and APS) during the Project period. Collaborations with National Laboratory and industrial partners were nurtured. Code improvements were made to facilitate code use. See: http://www.researchapplicationscorp.com. The ePLAS code enjoys EAR99 export control treatment, permitting distribution to most foreign countries without a license.},
doi = {10.2172/1023768},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1023768}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {9}
}