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Title: Microbial Diversity-Based Novel Crop Protection Products

Abstract

Extremophilic microorganisms are adapted to survive in ecological niches with high temperatures, extremes of pH, high salt concentrations, high pressure, radiation, etc. Extremophiles produce unique biocatalysts and natural products that function under extreme conditions comparab le to those prevailing in various industrial processes. Therefore, there is burgeoning interest in bioprospecting for extremophiles with potential immediate use in agriculture, the food, chemical, and pharm aceutical industries, and environmental biotechnology. Over the years, several thousand extremophilic bacteria, archaea, and filamentous fungi were collected at extreme environmental sites in the USA, the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone surrounding the faeild nuclear power plant in Ukraine, in and around Lake Baikal in Siberia, and at geothermal sites on the Kamchatka peninsula in Russia. These organisms were cultured under proprietary conditions, and the cell- free supernatants were screened for biological activities against plant pathogenic fungi and major crop damaging insects. Promising peptide lead molecules were isolated, characterized, and sequenced. Relatively high hit rates characterized the tested fermentation broths. Of the 26,000 samples screened, over thousand contained biological activity of interest. A fair number of microorganisms expressed broad- spectrum antifungal or insecticidal activity. Two- dozen broadly antifungal peptides (AFPs) are alr eady patent protected, and many more tensmore » are under further investigation. Tapping the gene pool of extremophilic microorganisms to provide novel ways of crop protection proved a successful strategy.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Life Sciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
1023379
Report Number(s):
LBNL-4686E-Poster
TRN: US1104520
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ASM General Meeting, Toronto, Canada, May 20-25, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60; AGRICULTURE; BACTERIA; BIOTECHNOLOGY; CROPS; FERMENTATION; FOOD; FUNGI; GENES; INSECTS; MICROORGANISMS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; PEPTIDES; Extremophiles; crop protection; antifungal polypeptide

Citation Formats

Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., DuPont Experimental Station, Yalpani, Ronald Flannagan, Rafael Herrmann, James Presnail, Tamas Torok, and Nasser, Herrmann, Rafael, Presnail, James, Torok, Tamas, and Yalpani, Nasser. Microbial Diversity-Based Novel Crop Protection Products. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., DuPont Experimental Station, Yalpani, Ronald Flannagan, Rafael Herrmann, James Presnail, Tamas Torok, and Nasser, Herrmann, Rafael, Presnail, James, Torok, Tamas, & Yalpani, Nasser. Microbial Diversity-Based Novel Crop Protection Products. United States.
Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., DuPont Experimental Station, Yalpani, Ronald Flannagan, Rafael Herrmann, James Presnail, Tamas Torok, and Nasser, Herrmann, Rafael, Presnail, James, Torok, Tamas, and Yalpani, Nasser. Thu . "Microbial Diversity-Based Novel Crop Protection Products". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1023379.
@article{osti_1023379,
title = {Microbial Diversity-Based Novel Crop Protection Products},
author = {Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc. and DuPont Experimental Station and Yalpani, Ronald Flannagan, Rafael Herrmann, James Presnail, Tamas Torok, and Nasser and Herrmann, Rafael and Presnail, James and Torok, Tamas and Yalpani, Nasser},
abstractNote = {Extremophilic microorganisms are adapted to survive in ecological niches with high temperatures, extremes of pH, high salt concentrations, high pressure, radiation, etc. Extremophiles produce unique biocatalysts and natural products that function under extreme conditions comparab le to those prevailing in various industrial processes. Therefore, there is burgeoning interest in bioprospecting for extremophiles with potential immediate use in agriculture, the food, chemical, and pharm aceutical industries, and environmental biotechnology. Over the years, several thousand extremophilic bacteria, archaea, and filamentous fungi were collected at extreme environmental sites in the USA, the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone surrounding the faeild nuclear power plant in Ukraine, in and around Lake Baikal in Siberia, and at geothermal sites on the Kamchatka peninsula in Russia. These organisms were cultured under proprietary conditions, and the cell- free supernatants were screened for biological activities against plant pathogenic fungi and major crop damaging insects. Promising peptide lead molecules were isolated, characterized, and sequenced. Relatively high hit rates characterized the tested fermentation broths. Of the 26,000 samples screened, over thousand contained biological activity of interest. A fair number of microorganisms expressed broad- spectrum antifungal or insecticidal activity. Two- dozen broadly antifungal peptides (AFPs) are alr eady patent protected, and many more tens are under further investigation. Tapping the gene pool of extremophilic microorganisms to provide novel ways of crop protection proved a successful strategy.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu May 10 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu May 10 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Powerful methods that can be used to explore and better surmise the role of microorganisms in the environment have only been developed in the last 20 years, and the discoveries being made with these techniques have been revolutionary compared to those of the previous century. These new molecular tools now enable us to better categorize microbial life and determine its diversity. The importance of the ecosystem and economic functions served by microorganisms further suggests that microbial diversity should be considered as an important, if unseen, component of biodiversity, and that consideration of microbial diversity is an essential element of anymore » program to conserve biodiversity.« less
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  • Short communication.
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