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Title: Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization

Abstract

The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US), Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1023177
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-77088
Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X; ESTHAG; 34942; 42318; KP1702030; TRN: US201118%%480
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science & Technology, 45(13):5483-5490; Journal Volume: 45; Journal Issue: 13
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; CYTOCHROMES; EFFICIENCY; FIBERS; FUNCTIONALS; MEMBRANES; POLYSACCHARIDES; SORPTION; Extracellular Polymeric Substances; Shewanella; carboxyl, phosphoryl, amide; Synechococcus elongates; Citrobacter sp.; Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans; Myxococcus xanthus; Pseudomonas stutzeri DSM 5190; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Cao, Bin, Ahmed, B., Kennedy, David W., Wang, Zheming, Shi, Liang, Marshall, Matthew J., Fredrickson, Jim K., Isern, Nancy G., Majors, Paul D., and Beyenal, Haluk. Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1021/es200095j.
Cao, Bin, Ahmed, B., Kennedy, David W., Wang, Zheming, Shi, Liang, Marshall, Matthew J., Fredrickson, Jim K., Isern, Nancy G., Majors, Paul D., & Beyenal, Haluk. Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization. United States. doi:10.1021/es200095j.
Cao, Bin, Ahmed, B., Kennedy, David W., Wang, Zheming, Shi, Liang, Marshall, Matthew J., Fredrickson, Jim K., Isern, Nancy G., Majors, Paul D., and Beyenal, Haluk. 2011. "Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization". United States. doi:10.1021/es200095j.
@article{osti_1023177,
title = {Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization},
author = {Cao, Bin and Ahmed, B. and Kennedy, David W. and Wang, Zheming and Shi, Liang and Marshall, Matthew J. and Fredrickson, Jim K. and Isern, Nancy G. and Majors, Paul D. and Beyenal, Haluk},
abstractNote = {The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.},
doi = {10.1021/es200095j},
journal = {Environmental Science & Technology, 45(13):5483-5490},
number = 13,
volume = 45,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month = 6
}
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