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Title: Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India

Abstract

Up to 19.4% of vehicle fuel consumption in India is devoted to air conditioning (A/C). Indian A/C fuel consumption is almost four times the fuel penalty in the United States and close to six times that in the European Union because India's temperature and humidity are higher and because road congestion forces vehicles to operate inefficiently. Car A/C efficiency in India is an issue worthy of national attention considering the rate of increase of A/C penetration into the new car market, India's hot climatic conditions and high fuel costs. Car A/C systems originally posed an ozone layer depletion concern. Now that industrialized and many developing countries have moved away from ozone-depleting substances per Montreal Protocol obligations, car A/C impact on climate has captured the attention of policy makers and corporate leaders. Car A/C systems have a climate impact from potent global warming potential gas emissions and from fuel used to power the car A/Cs. This paper focuses on car A/C fuel consumption in the context of the rapidly expanding Indian car market and how new technological improvements can result in significant fuel savings and consequently, emission reductions. A 19.4% fuel penalty is associated with A/C use in the typical Indianmore » passenger car. Car A/C fuel use and associated tailpipe emissions are strong functions of vehicle design, vehicle use, and climate conditions. Several techniques: reducing thermal load, improving vehicle design, improving occupants thermal comfort design, improving equipment, educating consumers on impacts of driver behaviour on MAC fuel use, and others - can lead to reduced A/C fuel consumption.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1023057
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: [Proceedings] VTMS-8 - Vehicle Thermal Management Systems Conference and Exhibition, 20-24 May 2007, Witney, Oxford, United Kingdom; Related Information: For preprint version see NREL/CP-540-41154
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR CONDITIONING; AUTOMOBILES; CLIMATIC CHANGE; DESIGN; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; EFFICIENCY; FUEL CONSUMPTION; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; HUMIDITY; INDIA; MANAGEMENT; MARKET; OCCUPANTS; OZONE LAYER; THERMAL COMFORT; Transportation

Citation Formats

Chaney, L., Thundiyil, K., Andersen, S., Chidambaram, S., and Abbi, Y. P. Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Chaney, L., Thundiyil, K., Andersen, S., Chidambaram, S., & Abbi, Y. P. Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India. United States.
Chaney, L., Thundiyil, K., Andersen, S., Chidambaram, S., and Abbi, Y. P. Mon . "Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1023057,
title = {Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India},
author = {Chaney, L. and Thundiyil, K. and Andersen, S. and Chidambaram, S. and Abbi, Y. P.},
abstractNote = {Up to 19.4% of vehicle fuel consumption in India is devoted to air conditioning (A/C). Indian A/C fuel consumption is almost four times the fuel penalty in the United States and close to six times that in the European Union because India's temperature and humidity are higher and because road congestion forces vehicles to operate inefficiently. Car A/C efficiency in India is an issue worthy of national attention considering the rate of increase of A/C penetration into the new car market, India's hot climatic conditions and high fuel costs. Car A/C systems originally posed an ozone layer depletion concern. Now that industrialized and many developing countries have moved away from ozone-depleting substances per Montreal Protocol obligations, car A/C impact on climate has captured the attention of policy makers and corporate leaders. Car A/C systems have a climate impact from potent global warming potential gas emissions and from fuel used to power the car A/Cs. This paper focuses on car A/C fuel consumption in the context of the rapidly expanding Indian car market and how new technological improvements can result in significant fuel savings and consequently, emission reductions. A 19.4% fuel penalty is associated with A/C use in the typical Indian passenger car. Car A/C fuel use and associated tailpipe emissions are strong functions of vehicle design, vehicle use, and climate conditions. Several techniques: reducing thermal load, improving vehicle design, improving occupants thermal comfort design, improving equipment, educating consumers on impacts of driver behaviour on MAC fuel use, and others - can lead to reduced A/C fuel consumption.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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