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Title: Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions

Abstract

Commercialization of black liquor and biomass gasification technologies is anticipated in the 2010-2015 time frame, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are already commercially established in the gas-to-liquids or coal-to-liquids industries. This set of two papers describes key results from a major assessment of the prospective energy, environmental, and financial performance of commercial gasification-based biorefineries integrated with kraft pulp and paper mills [1]. Seven detailed biorefinery designs were developed for a reference mill in the southeastern United States, together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which could be refined to vehicle fuels at an existing petroleum refinery), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or propane substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. This paper describes the key assumptions that underlie the biorefinery designs. Part B will present analytical results.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1022297
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Tappi Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 11, November 2008; Journal ID: ISSN 0734-1415
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; AIR; BIOMASS; CAPITAL; COMMERCIALIZATION; DIESEL ENGINES; ELECTRICITY; GASIFICATION; LIQUID FUELS; METHYL ETHER; PERFORMANCE; PETROLEUM; PROPANE; SPENT LIQUORS; STEAM; SYNTHESIS; SYNTHESIS GAS; SYNTHETIC PETROLEUM; Bioenergy

Citation Formats

Larson, E D, Consonni, S, Katofsky, R E, Iisa, K, and Frederick, W. J., Jr. Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions. United States: N. p., 2008. Web.
Larson, E D, Consonni, S, Katofsky, R E, Iisa, K, & Frederick, W. J., Jr. Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions. United States.
Larson, E D, Consonni, S, Katofsky, R E, Iisa, K, and Frederick, W. J., Jr. Sat . "Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions". United States.
@article{osti_1022297,
title = {Assessment of Gasification-Based Biorefining at Kraft Pulp and Paper Mills in the United States, Part A: Background and Assumptions},
author = {Larson, E D and Consonni, S and Katofsky, R E and Iisa, K and Frederick, W. J., Jr.},
abstractNote = {Commercialization of black liquor and biomass gasification technologies is anticipated in the 2010-2015 time frame, and synthesis gas from gasifiers can be converted into liquid fuels using catalytic synthesis technologies that are already commercially established in the gas-to-liquids or coal-to-liquids industries. This set of two papers describes key results from a major assessment of the prospective energy, environmental, and financial performance of commercial gasification-based biorefineries integrated with kraft pulp and paper mills [1]. Seven detailed biorefinery designs were developed for a reference mill in the southeastern United States, together with the associated mass/energy balances, air emissions estimates, and capital investment requirements. The biorefineries provide chemical recovery services and co-produce process steam for the mill, some electricity, and one of three liquid fuels: a Fischer-Tropsch synthetic crude oil (which could be refined to vehicle fuels at an existing petroleum refinery), dimethyl ether (a diesel engine fuel or propane substitute), or an ethanol-rich mixed-alcohol product. This paper describes the key assumptions that underlie the biorefinery designs. Part B will present analytical results.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1022297}, journal = {Tappi Journal},
issn = {0734-1415},
number = 11, November 2008,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {11}
}