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Title: High current induction linacs

Abstract

Induction linacs are among the most powerful accelerators in existence. They have accelerated electron bunches of several kiloamperes, and are being investigated as drivers for heavy ion driven inertial confinement fusion (HIF), which requires peak beam currents of kiloamperes and average beam powers of some tens of megawatts. The requirement for waste transmutation with an 800 MeV proton or deuteron beam with an average current of 50 mA and an average power of 40 MW lies midway between the electron machines and the heavy ion machines in overall difficulty. Much of the technology and understanding of beam physics carries over from the previous machines to the new requirements. The induction linac allows use of a very large beam aperture, which may turn out to be crucial to reducing beam loss and machine activation from the beam halo. The major issues addressed here are transport of high intensity beams, availability of sources, efficiency of acceleration, and the state of the needed technology for the waste treatment application. Because of the transformer-like action of an induction core and the accompanying magnetizing current, induction linacs make the most economic sense and have the highest efficiencies with large beam currents. Based on present understandingmore » of beam transport limits, induction core magnetizing current requirements, and pulse modulators, the efficiencies could be very high. The study of beam transport at high intensities has been the major activity of the HIF community. Beam transport and sources are limiting at low energies but are not significant constraints at the higher energies. As will be shown, the proton beams will be space-charge-dominated, for which the emittance has only a minor effect on the overall beam diameter but does determine the density falloff at the beam edge.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10196830
Report Number(s):
LBL-35960; HIFAN-666; CONF-9407103-32
ON: DE95003442;
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International conference on accelerator-driven transmutation technologies and applications,Las Vegas, NV (United States),25 Jul - 1 Aug 1994; Other Information: PBD: Jul 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; DESIGN; BEAM TRANSPORT; EQUATIONS OF MOTION; INERTIAL CONFINEMENT; INSTABILITY; BEAM PULSERS; ION BEAM FUSION REACTORS; 700411; 430100; INERTIAL CONFINEMENT DEVICES; DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, AND OPERATION

Citation Formats

Barletta, W., Faltens, A., Henestroza, E., and Lee, E. High current induction linacs. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Barletta, W., Faltens, A., Henestroza, E., & Lee, E. High current induction linacs. United States.
Barletta, W., Faltens, A., Henestroza, E., and Lee, E. Fri . "High current induction linacs". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10196830.
@article{osti_10196830,
title = {High current induction linacs},
author = {Barletta, W. and Faltens, A. and Henestroza, E. and Lee, E.},
abstractNote = {Induction linacs are among the most powerful accelerators in existence. They have accelerated electron bunches of several kiloamperes, and are being investigated as drivers for heavy ion driven inertial confinement fusion (HIF), which requires peak beam currents of kiloamperes and average beam powers of some tens of megawatts. The requirement for waste transmutation with an 800 MeV proton or deuteron beam with an average current of 50 mA and an average power of 40 MW lies midway between the electron machines and the heavy ion machines in overall difficulty. Much of the technology and understanding of beam physics carries over from the previous machines to the new requirements. The induction linac allows use of a very large beam aperture, which may turn out to be crucial to reducing beam loss and machine activation from the beam halo. The major issues addressed here are transport of high intensity beams, availability of sources, efficiency of acceleration, and the state of the needed technology for the waste treatment application. Because of the transformer-like action of an induction core and the accompanying magnetizing current, induction linacs make the most economic sense and have the highest efficiencies with large beam currents. Based on present understanding of beam transport limits, induction core magnetizing current requirements, and pulse modulators, the efficiencies could be very high. The study of beam transport at high intensities has been the major activity of the HIF community. Beam transport and sources are limiting at low energies but are not significant constraints at the higher energies. As will be shown, the proton beams will be space-charge-dominated, for which the emittance has only a minor effect on the overall beam diameter but does determine the density falloff at the beam edge.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {7}
}

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