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Title: A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements

Abstract

We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistancemore » gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1018837
Report Number(s):
UCRL-JRNL-236055
TRN: US201114%%366
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: PLoS ONE, vol. 3, no. 5, May 14, 2008, e2163; Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; AEROSOLS; ANTIBIOTICS; DESIGN; DETECTION; DNA; ESCHERICHIA COLI; FUNCTIONALS; GENES; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LABORATORY; MICROORGANISMS; PATHOGENS; PROBES; STAPHYLOCOCCUS; STRAINS; TARGETS; TOLERANCE; VIRULENCE

Citation Formats

Jaing, C. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Jaing, C. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements. United States.
Jaing, C. Thu . "A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1018837.
@article{osti_1018837,
title = {A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements},
author = {Jaing, C},
abstractNote = {We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.},
doi = {},
journal = {PLoS ONE, vol. 3, no. 5, May 14, 2008, e2163},
number = 5,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Nov 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Thu Nov 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Aims: To assess the virulence of Aeromonas spp. using two models, a neonatal mouse assay and a mouse intestinal cell culture. Methods and Results: After artificial infection with a variety of Aeromonas spp., mRNA extracts from the two models were processed and hydridized to murine microarrays to determine host gene response. Definition of virulence was determined based on host mRNA production in murine neonatal intestinal tissue and mortality of infected animals. Infections of mouse intestinal cell cultures were then performed to determine whether this simpler model system’s mRNA responses correlated to neonatal results and therefore be predictive of virulence ofmore » Aeromonas spp. Virulent aeromonads up-regulated transcripts in both models including multiple host defense gene products (chemokines, regulation of transcription and apoptosis and cell signalling). Avirulent species exhibited little or no host response in neonates. Mortality results correlated well with both bacterial dose and average fold change of up-regulated transcripts in the neonatal mice. Conclusions: Cell culture results were less discriminating but showed promise as potentially being able to be predictive of virulence. Jun oncogene up-regulation in murine cell culture is potentially predictive of Aeromonas virulence. Significance and Impact of the Study: Having the ability to determine virulence of waterborne pathogens quickly would potentially assist public health officials to rapidly assess exposure risks.« less
  • A DNA gene probe was prepared to study genetic change mechanisms responsible for adaptation to mercury in natural bacterial communities. The probe was constructed from a 2.6-kilobase NcoI-EcoRI DNA restriction fragment which spans the majority of the mercury resistance operon (mer) in the R-factor R100. The range of specificity of this gene probe was defined by hybridization to the DNA of a wide variety of mercury-resistance bacteria previously shown to possess the mercuric reductase enzyme. All of the tested gram-negative bacteria had DNA sequences homologous to the mer probe, whereas no such homologies were detected in DNA of the gram-positivemore » strains. Thus, the mer probe can be utilized to study gene flow processes in gram-negative bacterial communities.« less
  • To understand how contaminants affect microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure, six groundwater monitoring wells from the Field Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP; Oak Ridge, TN), with a wide range of pH, nitrate, and heavy metal contamination were investigated. DNA from the groundwater community was analyzed with a functional gene array containing 2006 probes to detect genes involved in metal resistance, sulfate reduction, organic contaminant degradation, and carbon and nitrogen cycling. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. Highly contaminated wells had lower gene diversity butmore » greater signal intensity than the pristine well. The microbial composition was heterogeneous, with 17?70% overlap between different wells. Metal-resistant and metal-reducing microorganisms were detected in both contaminated and pristine wells, suggesting the potential for successful bioremediation of metal-contaminated groundwaters. In addition, results of Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis indicate that nitrate, sulfate, pH, uranium, and technetium have a significant (p < 0.05) effect on microbial community structure. This study provides an overall picture of microbial community structure in contaminated environments with functional gene arrays by showing that diversity and heterogeneity can vary greatly in relation to contamination.« less
  • To understand how contaminants affect microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure, six groundwater monitoring wells from the Field Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Science Program (ERSP; Oak Ridge, TN), with a wide range of pH, nitrate, and heavy metal contamination were investigated. DNA from the groundwater community was analyzed with a functional gene array containing 2006 probes to detect genes involved in metal resistance, sulfate reduction, organic contaminant degradation, and carbon and nitrogen cycling. Microbial diversity decreased in relation to the contamination levels of the wells. Highly contaminated wells had lower gene diversity butmore » greater signal intensity than the pristine well. The microbial composition was heterogeneous, with 17-70% overlap between different wells. Metal-resistant and metal-reducing microorganisms were detected in both contaminated and pristine wells, suggesting the potential for successful bioremediation of metal-contaminated groundwaters. In addition, results of Mantel tests and canonical correspondence analysis indicate that nitrate, sulfate, pH, uranium, and technetium have a significant (p < 0.05) effect on microbial community structure. This study provides an overall picture of microbial community structure in contaminated environments with functional gene arrays by showing that diversity and heterogeneity can vary greatly in relation to contamination.« less
  • RT-PCR using a commercial kit for yellow head virus (YHV) detection in growth-retarded shrimp yielded an unusual 777 bp amplicon instead of expected amplicons of 277 bp for YHV type-1 (YHV-1) or 406 bp for YHV type-2 (YHV-2). Cloning and sequencing (GenBank (EU170438)) revealed approximately 80% identity to non-structural (NS) ORF1b sequences of both YHV-1 (GenBank (AA083987)) and YHV-2 (GenBank (AF227196)), indicating an atypical YHV type (A-YHV) phylogenetically equidistant from both types. An RT-PCR test specifically designed for A-YHV revealed that it was uncommon and that its occurrence in shrimp culture ponds did not correlate with growth retardation or mortality.more » By immunohistochemistry with YHV-specific monoclonal antibodies, the A-YHV gave positive reactions for envelope protein gp64 and capsid protein p20, but not for envelope protein gp116, even though gp116 and gp64 originate from a polyprotein of ORF3. Lack of gp116 immunoreactivity correlated with a large ORF3 deletion (GenBank (EU123854)) in the region of the protein targeted by an MAb against gp116. Transmission electron microscopy of A-YHV-infected shrimp revealed only unenveloped pre-virions. During manuscript revision, information received revealed that typing of YHV isolates based on sequences of ORF1b and ORF3 had yielded several geographical types, including one virulent type (YHV-1b) with an ORF3 deletion sequence that matched the sequence of A-YHV. Using these sequences and an additional A-YHV sequence ( (EU853170)) from the ORF1b typing region, A-YHV potentially represents a recombinant between type 1b and type 5. SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis revealed that type 1b produced a gp116 deletion protein that did not bind with the MAb or polyclonal Ab to normal gp116. Overall, the information suggested that lack of A-YHV virulence was associated with the NS gene sequence linked to ORF1b rather than the deletion in ORF3.« less