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Title: Topological defects from doping and quenched disorder in artificial ice systems

Abstract

We examine the ice-rule obeying and ice-rule breaking vertices in an artificial spin ice system created using magnetic vortices in type-II superconductors with nanostructured pinning arrays. We show that this system can be doped by changing the external field to move the number of vortices away from commensurability and create sites that contain two or zero vortices. For a square ice, the doping leads to the formation of a grain boundary of vertices that do not obey the ice rules. In commensurate systems where the ice rules are obeyed, we can introduce random disorder at the individual pinning sites to create regions where vortices may not be able to flip from one side of the trap to another. For weak disorder, all of the vertices still obey the ice rules, while at intermediate levels of disorder we find grain boundaries of vertices which do not obey the ice rules. For strong disorder it is possible to create isolated paired vertices that do not obey the ice rules. In summary, we have shown that an artificial square ice can be created using vortices in a type-II superconductor interacting with a periodic array of pinning sites where each site has a doublemore » well potential. By defining the direction of the effective spin according to the side of the double well occupied by the vortex, we find that this system obeys the ice rules for square ice. We add disorder to the system in the form of randomness of the height of the potential barrier at the center of the well, and obtain vertex configurations using a rotating drive protocol which is similar to the shaking ac magnetic field used in nanomagnetic systems. For weak disorder the entire system still obeys the square ice rules. For intermediate disorder, ice-rule breaking vertices appear and form grain boundaries, while for strong disorder there are both gain boundaries and isolated paired defects. In a system with uniform potential barrier heights, we introduce disorder by moving away from commensurability and creating Home pinning sites that contain two or zero vortices. In this case we find grain boundaries that emanate from the defect site and span the sample.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
  2. BABES-BOLYAI UNIV
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1018701
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-10-03993; LA-UR-10-3993
TRN: US201114%%294
DOE Contract Number:  
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International Conference on Electromagnetics in Advanced Applications ; September 20, 2010 ; Sydney, Australia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; DEFECTS; GRAIN BOUNDARIES; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MAGNETIC FLUX; POTENTIALS; RANDOMNESS; SPIN; TYPE-II SUPERCONDUCTORS; VORTICES

Citation Formats

Reichhardt, Charles, Reichhardt, Cynthia J, and Libal, A. Topological defects from doping and quenched disorder in artificial ice systems. United States: N. p., 2010. Web.
Reichhardt, Charles, Reichhardt, Cynthia J, & Libal, A. Topological defects from doping and quenched disorder in artificial ice systems. United States.
Reichhardt, Charles, Reichhardt, Cynthia J, and Libal, A. Fri . "Topological defects from doping and quenched disorder in artificial ice systems". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1018701.
@article{osti_1018701,
title = {Topological defects from doping and quenched disorder in artificial ice systems},
author = {Reichhardt, Charles and Reichhardt, Cynthia J and Libal, A},
abstractNote = {We examine the ice-rule obeying and ice-rule breaking vertices in an artificial spin ice system created using magnetic vortices in type-II superconductors with nanostructured pinning arrays. We show that this system can be doped by changing the external field to move the number of vortices away from commensurability and create sites that contain two or zero vortices. For a square ice, the doping leads to the formation of a grain boundary of vertices that do not obey the ice rules. In commensurate systems where the ice rules are obeyed, we can introduce random disorder at the individual pinning sites to create regions where vortices may not be able to flip from one side of the trap to another. For weak disorder, all of the vertices still obey the ice rules, while at intermediate levels of disorder we find grain boundaries of vertices which do not obey the ice rules. For strong disorder it is possible to create isolated paired vertices that do not obey the ice rules. In summary, we have shown that an artificial square ice can be created using vortices in a type-II superconductor interacting with a periodic array of pinning sites where each site has a double well potential. By defining the direction of the effective spin according to the side of the double well occupied by the vortex, we find that this system obeys the ice rules for square ice. We add disorder to the system in the form of randomness of the height of the potential barrier at the center of the well, and obtain vertex configurations using a rotating drive protocol which is similar to the shaking ac magnetic field used in nanomagnetic systems. For weak disorder the entire system still obeys the square ice rules. For intermediate disorder, ice-rule breaking vertices appear and form grain boundaries, while for strong disorder there are both gain boundaries and isolated paired defects. In a system with uniform potential barrier heights, we introduce disorder by moving away from commensurability and creating Home pinning sites that contain two or zero vortices. In this case we find grain boundaries that emanate from the defect site and span the sample.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2010},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
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