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Title: The Nuclear Detonation Detection System on the GPS satellites

Abstract

This article begins with a historical perspective of satellite usage in monitoring nuclear detonations. Current capabilities of the 24 GPS satellites in detecting the light, gamma rays, x-rays and neutrons from a nuclear explosion are described. In particular, an optical radiometer developed at Sandia National Laboratories is characterized. Operational information and calibration procedures are emphasized.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
  2. Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10185731
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-93-2834
ON: DE93040833
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 27 Jul 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; SATELLITES; RADIOMETERS; ARMS CONTROL; VERIFICATION; NUCLEAR EXPLOSION DETECTION; AERIAL MONITORING; 350300; 440101; GENERAL DETECTORS OR MONITORS AND RADIOMETRIC INSTRUMENTS

Citation Formats

Higbie, P R, and Blocker, N K. The Nuclear Detonation Detection System on the GPS satellites. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.2172/10185731.
Higbie, P R, & Blocker, N K. The Nuclear Detonation Detection System on the GPS satellites. United States. doi:10.2172/10185731.
Higbie, P R, and Blocker, N K. Tue . "The Nuclear Detonation Detection System on the GPS satellites". United States. doi:10.2172/10185731. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10185731.
@article{osti_10185731,
title = {The Nuclear Detonation Detection System on the GPS satellites},
author = {Higbie, P R and Blocker, N K},
abstractNote = {This article begins with a historical perspective of satellite usage in monitoring nuclear detonations. Current capabilities of the 24 GPS satellites in detecting the light, gamma rays, x-rays and neutrons from a nuclear explosion are described. In particular, an optical radiometer developed at Sandia National Laboratories is characterized. Operational information and calibration procedures are emphasized.},
doi = {10.2172/10185731},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1993},
month = {7}
}