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Title: IRP methods for Environmental Impact Statements of utility expansion plans

Abstract

Most large electric utilities and a growing number of gas utilities in the United States are using a planning method -- Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) - which incorporates demand-side management (DSM) programs whenever the marginal cost of the DSM programs are lower than the marginal cost of supply-side expansion options. Argonne National Laboratory has applied the IRP method in its socio-economic analysis of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) of power marketing for a system of electric utilities in the mountain and western regions of the United States. Applying the IRP methods provides valuable information to the participants in an EIS process involving capacity expansion of an electric or gas utility. The major challenges of applying the IRP method within an EIS are the time consuming and costly task of developing a least cost expansion path for each altemative, the detailed quantification of environmental damages associated with capacity expansion, and the explicit inclusion of societal-impacts to the region.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10183486
Report Number(s):
ANL/CP-77427; CONF-9209160-21
ON: DE93000608
DOE Contract Number:
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International symposium on energy, environment and information management,Argonne, IL (United States),15-18 Sep 1992; Other Information: PBD: [1992]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; EVALUATION; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; CAPACITY; SOCIO-ECONOMIC FACTORS; POWER DEMAND; PLANNING; 540110; 540210; 540310; 200500; BASIC STUDIES; ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS

Citation Formats

Cavallo, J.D., Hemphill, R.C., and Veselka, T.D. IRP methods for Environmental Impact Statements of utility expansion plans. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Cavallo, J.D., Hemphill, R.C., & Veselka, T.D. IRP methods for Environmental Impact Statements of utility expansion plans. United States.
Cavallo, J.D., Hemphill, R.C., and Veselka, T.D. 1992. "IRP methods for Environmental Impact Statements of utility expansion plans". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10183486.
@article{osti_10183486,
title = {IRP methods for Environmental Impact Statements of utility expansion plans},
author = {Cavallo, J.D. and Hemphill, R.C. and Veselka, T.D.},
abstractNote = {Most large electric utilities and a growing number of gas utilities in the United States are using a planning method -- Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) - which incorporates demand-side management (DSM) programs whenever the marginal cost of the DSM programs are lower than the marginal cost of supply-side expansion options. Argonne National Laboratory has applied the IRP method in its socio-economic analysis of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) of power marketing for a system of electric utilities in the mountain and western regions of the United States. Applying the IRP methods provides valuable information to the participants in an EIS process involving capacity expansion of an electric or gas utility. The major challenges of applying the IRP method within an EIS are the time consuming and costly task of developing a least cost expansion path for each altemative, the detailed quantification of environmental damages associated with capacity expansion, and the explicit inclusion of societal-impacts to the region.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1992,
month =
}

Conference:
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  • Most large electric utilities and a growing number of gas utilities in the United States are using a planning method -- Integrated Resource Planning (IRP) - which incorporates demand-side management (DSM) programs whenever the marginal cost of the DSM programs are lower than the marginal cost of supply-side expansion options. Argonne National Laboratory has applied the IRP method in its socio-economic analysis of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) of power marketing for a system of electric utilities in the mountain and western regions of the United States. Applying the IRP methods provides valuable information to the participants in an EISmore » process involving capacity expansion of an electric or gas utility. The major challenges of applying the IRP method within an EIS are the time consuming and costly task of developing a least cost expansion path for each altemative, the detailed quantification of environmental damages associated with capacity expansion, and the explicit inclusion of societal-impacts to the region.« less
  • Programmatic environmental impact statements (EISs) are comprehensive documents that integrate environmental considerations into planning and operational decisions at the concept level, avoiding the need for repetitive environmental documentation of specific actions. Procedures developed in the programmatic EIS provide a process for incorporating environmental considerations into the planning phase of future actions and assist in determining the type of environmental considerations into the planning phase of future actions and assist in determining the type of environmental documentation necessary. The programmatic EIS project area is divided into recognizable geographic zones. These zones are mapped and an evaluation zone summary sheet is developedmore » for each area that contains an inventory of pertinent information for analysis of environmental issues. On each map and summary sheet, sensitive zones that are adversely affected and/or require mitigation for implementation of proposed actions are easily recognizable. Accompanying narrative provides both insight for mitigating potential impacts within the sensitive areas and how such impacts should be addressed. Additional assistance in evaluating the effects of planned actions is provided by identifying thresholds of significance at which the effect of a proposed action may prompt the need for environmental documentation.« less
  • Current US Department of Energy (DOE) guidance on the performance of accident analyses supported an environmental impact statement (EIS) stresses a graded approach that emphasizes the most important risks, calls for the evaluation of frequencies as well as consequences for severe accident scenarios, and discourages the use of bounding analyses that confound risk comparisons among EIS alternatives. This paper discusses methods in probabilistic risk analysis that were developed and applied in defining accidents and generating radiological source terms for the DOE Draft Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS); publication of the Final WM PEIS is due in latemore » summer 1996. The strengths and shortcomings of the cited probabilistic risk analysis methods used to evaluate facility accidents are addressed, both as they relate to the WM PEIS and as they relate to more general EIS applications. Key guidance is discussed that was developed by DOE and used in shaping the techniques cited herein for application in an EIS. Related perceptions on accidents observed from the public comment process for the WM PEIS are cited. Finally, recommendations are made on the basis of needs as well as lessons learned in implementing the accident analysis for the WM PEIS.« less
  • The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has recently prepared or is in the process of preparing a number of programmatic and site-specific environmental impact statements (EISs). This study was conducted for the purpose of reviewing the self-consistency of programmatic alternatives, associated relative impacts, and supporting data, methods, and assumptions in EISs prepared for related activities. The following EISs, which deal with waste management issues, are reviewed in this paper (the parenthetical acronyms are referred to in Table 1): (1) Final Environmental Impact Statement, Savannah River Site Waste Management, DOE/EIS-0217, Vol. II, July 1995. (SRS WM-EIS), (2) Draft Waste Management Programmaticmore » Environmental Impact Statement for Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste, DOE/EIS-0200-D, Vol. IV, Aug. 1995. (WM PEIS), (3) Final Environmental Impact Statement, Interim Management of Nuclear Materials at the Savannah River Site. DOE/EIS-0220, Oct. 1995. (IMNM EIS), (4) Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0203-F, April 1995. (INEL Site-Wide-EIS), (5) Draft Environmental Impact Statement, Disposition of Surplus Highly Enriched Uranium, DOE/EIS-0240-D, Oct. 1995. (HEU Disposition EIS), (6) Final Environmental Impact Statement, Safe Interim Storage of Hanford Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, DOE/EIS-0212, Oct. 1995. (SIS EIS). This study compares the facility accident analysis approaches used in these EISs vis-a-vis the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) guidance developed by DOE (Recommendations for the Preparation of Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements, Office of NEPA Oversight). The purpose of the comparative review of these approaches with NEPA guidance is to identify potential preferred paths for future EISs.« less