skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Validation of analysis methods for assessing flawed piping subjected to dynamic loading

Abstract

Argonne National Laboratory and Battelle have jointly conducted a research program for the USNRC to evaluate the ability of current engineering analysis methods and one state-of-the-art analysis method to predict the behavior of circumferentially surface-cracked pipe system water-hammer experiment. The experimental data used in the evaluation were from the HDR Test Group E31 series conducted by the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany. The incentive for this evaluation was that simplified engineering methods, as well as newer ``state-of-the-art`` fracture analysis methods, have been typically validated only with static experimental data. Hence, these dynamic experiments were of high interest. High-rate dynamic loading can be classified as either repeating, e.g., seismic, or nonrepeating, e.g., water hammer. Development of experimental data and validation of cracked pipe analyses under seismic loading (repeating dynamic loads) are being pursued separately within the NRC`s International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. This report describes developmental and validation efforts to predict crack stability under water hammer loading, as well as comparisons using currently used analysis procedures. Current fracture analysis methods use the elastic stress analysis loads decoupled from the fracture mechanics analysis, while state-of-the-art methods employ nonlinear cracked-pipe time-history finite element analyses. The results showed that the current decoupledmore » methods were conservative in their predictions, whereas the cracked pipe finite element analyses were more accurate, yet slightly conservative. The nonlinear time-history cracked-pipe finite element analyses conducted in this program were also attractive in that they were done on a small Apollo DN5500 workstation, whereas other cracked-pipe dynamic analyses conducted in Europe on the same experiments required the use of a CRAY2 supercomputer, and were less accurate.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)
  2. Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering; Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10176738
Report Number(s):
NUREG/CR-6234; ANL-94/22; BMI-2178
ON: TI94017485; TRN: 94:018804
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-92; W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Aug 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; PIPES; CRACKS; DYNAMIC LOADS; WATER HAMMER; CRACK PROPAGATION; FRACTURE MECHANICS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; TESTING; STRESS ANALYSIS; COMPUTER CALCULATIONS; 220200; 360103; COMPONENTS AND ACCESSORIES; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES

Citation Formats

Olson, R.J., Wolterman, R.L., Wilkowski, G.M., and Kot, C.A. Validation of analysis methods for assessing flawed piping subjected to dynamic loading. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.2172/10176738.
Olson, R.J., Wolterman, R.L., Wilkowski, G.M., & Kot, C.A. Validation of analysis methods for assessing flawed piping subjected to dynamic loading. United States. doi:10.2172/10176738.
Olson, R.J., Wolterman, R.L., Wilkowski, G.M., and Kot, C.A. Mon . "Validation of analysis methods for assessing flawed piping subjected to dynamic loading". United States. doi:10.2172/10176738. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10176738.
@article{osti_10176738,
title = {Validation of analysis methods for assessing flawed piping subjected to dynamic loading},
author = {Olson, R.J. and Wolterman, R.L. and Wilkowski, G.M. and Kot, C.A.},
abstractNote = {Argonne National Laboratory and Battelle have jointly conducted a research program for the USNRC to evaluate the ability of current engineering analysis methods and one state-of-the-art analysis method to predict the behavior of circumferentially surface-cracked pipe system water-hammer experiment. The experimental data used in the evaluation were from the HDR Test Group E31 series conducted by the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) in Germany. The incentive for this evaluation was that simplified engineering methods, as well as newer ``state-of-the-art`` fracture analysis methods, have been typically validated only with static experimental data. Hence, these dynamic experiments were of high interest. High-rate dynamic loading can be classified as either repeating, e.g., seismic, or nonrepeating, e.g., water hammer. Development of experimental data and validation of cracked pipe analyses under seismic loading (repeating dynamic loads) are being pursued separately within the NRC`s International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. This report describes developmental and validation efforts to predict crack stability under water hammer loading, as well as comparisons using currently used analysis procedures. Current fracture analysis methods use the elastic stress analysis loads decoupled from the fracture mechanics analysis, while state-of-the-art methods employ nonlinear cracked-pipe time-history finite element analyses. The results showed that the current decoupled methods were conservative in their predictions, whereas the cracked pipe finite element analyses were more accurate, yet slightly conservative. The nonlinear time-history cracked-pipe finite element analyses conducted in this program were also attractive in that they were done on a small Apollo DN5500 workstation, whereas other cracked-pipe dynamic analyses conducted in Europe on the same experiments required the use of a CRAY2 supercomputer, and were less accurate.},
doi = {10.2172/10176738},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: