skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Selecting the best defect reduction methodology

Abstract

Defect rates less than 10 parts per million, unimaginable a few years ago, have become the standard of world-class quality. To reduce defects, companies are aggressively implementing various quality methodologies, such as Statistical Quality Control Motorola`s Six Sigma, or Shingo`s poka-yok. Although each quality methodology reduces defects, selection has been based on an intuitive sense without understanding their relative effectiveness in each application. A missing link in developing superior defect reduction strategies has been a lack of a general defect model that clarifies the unique focus of each method. Toward the goal of efficient defect reduction, we have developed an event tree which addresses a broad spectrum of quality factors and two defect sources, namely, error and variation. The Quality Control Tree (QCT) predictions are more consistent with production experience than obtained by the other methodologies considered independently. The QCT demonstrates that world-class defect rates cannot be achieved through focusing on a single defect source or quality control factor, a common weakness of many methodologies. We have shown that the most efficient defect reduction strategy depend on the relative strengths and weaknesses of each organization. The QCT can help each organization identify the most promising defect reduction opportunities for achievingmore » its goals.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10169855
Report Number(s):
SAND-94-8621
ON: DE94015782
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-76DR00789
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Apr 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; DEFECTS; FAULT TREE ANALYSIS; MANUFACTURING; QUALITY CONTROL; EFFICIENCY; PLANNING; STATISTICS; 420200; 320303; FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND TECHNIQUES; EQUIPMENT AND PROCESSES

Citation Formats

Hinckley, C M, and Barkan, P. Selecting the best defect reduction methodology. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.2172/10169855.
Hinckley, C M, & Barkan, P. Selecting the best defect reduction methodology. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/10169855
Hinckley, C M, and Barkan, P. Fri . "Selecting the best defect reduction methodology". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/10169855. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10169855.
@article{osti_10169855,
title = {Selecting the best defect reduction methodology},
author = {Hinckley, C M and Barkan, P},
abstractNote = {Defect rates less than 10 parts per million, unimaginable a few years ago, have become the standard of world-class quality. To reduce defects, companies are aggressively implementing various quality methodologies, such as Statistical Quality Control Motorola`s Six Sigma, or Shingo`s poka-yok. Although each quality methodology reduces defects, selection has been based on an intuitive sense without understanding their relative effectiveness in each application. A missing link in developing superior defect reduction strategies has been a lack of a general defect model that clarifies the unique focus of each method. Toward the goal of efficient defect reduction, we have developed an event tree which addresses a broad spectrum of quality factors and two defect sources, namely, error and variation. The Quality Control Tree (QCT) predictions are more consistent with production experience than obtained by the other methodologies considered independently. The QCT demonstrates that world-class defect rates cannot be achieved through focusing on a single defect source or quality control factor, a common weakness of many methodologies. We have shown that the most efficient defect reduction strategy depend on the relative strengths and weaknesses of each organization. The QCT can help each organization identify the most promising defect reduction opportunities for achieving its goals.},
doi = {10.2172/10169855},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/10169855}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {4}
}