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Title: Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report ten: Analysis of alternative-fuel fleet requirements

Abstract

The purpose of this technical report is to compare the altemative-fuel fleet requirements of the Administration`s National Energy Strategy (NES) with the alternative-fuel fleet requirements of S. 2166 (National Energy Security Act of 1992) and H.R. 776 (Comprehensive National Energy Policy Act). This comparison covers differences in oil displacement potential, cost of oil displacement, alternative-fuel vehicle (AFV) annual purchases, and number of AFV`s in operation by the year 201 0. This technical report is intended to provide perspective on the abilities of the NES, S. 2166, and H.R. 776 to help increase the use of alternative fuels in the US transportation sector, reduce dependence on petroleum, and enhance environmental quality. The estimates contained herein are reflective of S. 2166 as passed by the Senate on February 19, 1992, and H.R. 776 as reported by the House Energy and Commerce Committee on March 30, 1992.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Office of Domestic and International Energy Policy, Washington, DC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10167968
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 10167968; Legacy ID: DE92019108
Report Number(s):
DOE/PE--0103-P
ON: DE92019108; NC: NONE
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: May 1992
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; TRANSPORTATION SECTOR; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; FUEL SUBSTITUTION; COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS; VEHICLES; COST; LEGISLATION; FUEL CONSUMPTION; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; COMPILED DATA 320200; 290201; 298000; TRANSPORTATION; ECONOMICS; CONSUMPTION AND UTILIZATION

Citation Formats

Not Available. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report ten: Analysis of alternative-fuel fleet requirements. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Not Available. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report ten: Analysis of alternative-fuel fleet requirements. United States.
Not Available. Fri . "Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report ten: Analysis of alternative-fuel fleet requirements". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_10167968,
title = {Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report ten: Analysis of alternative-fuel fleet requirements},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this technical report is to compare the altemative-fuel fleet requirements of the Administration`s National Energy Strategy (NES) with the alternative-fuel fleet requirements of S. 2166 (National Energy Security Act of 1992) and H.R. 776 (Comprehensive National Energy Policy Act). This comparison covers differences in oil displacement potential, cost of oil displacement, alternative-fuel vehicle (AFV) annual purchases, and number of AFV`s in operation by the year 201 0. This technical report is intended to provide perspective on the abilities of the NES, S. 2166, and H.R. 776 to help increase the use of alternative fuels in the US transportation sector, reduce dependence on petroleum, and enhance environmental quality. The estimates contained herein are reflective of S. 2166 as passed by the Senate on February 19, 1992, and H.R. 776 as reported by the House Energy and Commerce Committee on March 30, 1992.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1992},
month = {Fri May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1992}
}

Technical Report:
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  • As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Departmentmore » of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.« less
  • The Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 (AMFA, Public Law 100--494) offers incentives in the form of fuel economy credits to manufacturers who produce vehicles capable of using natural gas or alcohol fuels. Specifically, Section 6 of AMFA allows manufacturers to count 1 gallon of alcohol fuel or 1 gallon equivalent of natural gas as only 0.15 gallon of ``fuel`` when calculating the manufacturer`s corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) number. Substitution of natural gas or alcohol fuels for gasoline in the transportation sector is likely to affect the prices of natural gas and distillate oil, which are important sources ofmore » energy for home heating. Therefore, Section 9 of AMFA calls for a study of the impact of the manufacturing incentives provision on the cost of home heating. This report provides that analysis. It evaluates and quantifies the possible effects of the CAFE provisions in terms of the following: (1) numbers of alternative- and dual-fuel vehicles that might be built as a result of this provision; (2) consumption of alcohol and natural gas by these vehicles; (3) whether the alcohol or compressed natural gas (CNG) is likely to be derived from domestic resources; (4) the effects on domestic natural gas and home heating oil prices; and, (5) the resulting impact on home heating costs. Only the impacts of manufacturing incentives for dedicated and dual-fuel alcohol-powered automobiles and dedicated and dual-fuel natural-gas-powered automobiles, as described in Section 6 of AMFA, are considered in this study. This report also contributes to the Department of Energy`s comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States. The DOE Altemative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability, but covers a wide range of issues.« less
  • As part of its Alternative Fuels Assessment, the US DOE is studying the use of compressed natural gas (CNG), methanol, and other derivatives of natural gas as alternative transportation fuels. One part of this study is determining the cost and most likely sources of new, uncommitted natural gas supply. Natural gas reserves in 32 countries are reviewed in detail. The results of the resource cost calculations are for the countries are reported.
  • In this report, estimates are provided of the potential, by 2010, to displace conventional light-duty vehicle motor fuels with alternative fuels--compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), methanol from natural gas, ethanol from grain and from cellulosic feedstocks, and electricity--and with replacement fuels such as oxygenates added to gasoline. The 2010 estimates include the motor fuel displacement resulting both from government programs (including the Clean Air Act and EPACT) and from potential market forces. This report also provides an estimate of motor fuel displacement by replacement and alterative fuels in the year 2000. However, in contrast to the 2010more » estimates, the year 2000 estimate is restricted to an accounting of the effects of existing programs and regulations. 27 figs., 108 tabs.« less
  • The Department of Energy (DOE) in 1988 undertook a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States. To keep interested parties informed about the progress of the DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment, the Department periodically publishes reports dealing with particular aspects of this complex study. This report provides an analysis of the expected costs to produce methanol and of several related issues. 17 refs., 21 figs., 44 tabs.