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Title: Singularities and Topological Phase Transitions in Fluids: Breaking Away, Selective Withdrawal, and Islets in the Stream

Abstract

The exhilarating spray from waves crashing into the shore, the distressing sound of a faucet leaking in the night, and the indispensable role of bubbles dissolving gas into the oceans are but a few examples of the ubiquitous presence and profound importance of drop formation and splashing in our lives. During fission, a fluid forms a neck that becomes vanishingly thin at the point of breakup. This topological transition is accompanied by a dynamic singularity in which physical properties such as pressure diverge. Singularities of this sort often organize the overall dynamical evolution of nonlinear systems. I will first discuss the role of singularities in the breakup of droplets. I will then present a second experiment, selective withdrawal, in which we study the steady-state shape of a liquid as it is withdrawn by a nozzle through a surrounding fluid. Here, a change in topology may again be accompanied by a singularity. Applications of this geometry that rely on singular dynamical behavior are relevant for the coating of biological particles that may be of particular use in medical transplantation technologies.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (University of Chicago)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1016697
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: Fermilab Colloquia, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batvia, Illinois (United States), presented on January 17, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; BUBBLES; COATINGS; FISSION; GEOMETRY; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; NOZZLES; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; SHAPE; SINGULARITY; TOPOLOGY

Citation Formats

Nagel, Sidney. Singularities and Topological Phase Transitions in Fluids: Breaking Away, Selective Withdrawal, and Islets in the Stream. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Nagel, Sidney. Singularities and Topological Phase Transitions in Fluids: Breaking Away, Selective Withdrawal, and Islets in the Stream. United States.
Nagel, Sidney. Wed . "Singularities and Topological Phase Transitions in Fluids: Breaking Away, Selective Withdrawal, and Islets in the Stream". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1016697.
@article{osti_1016697,
title = {Singularities and Topological Phase Transitions in Fluids: Breaking Away, Selective Withdrawal, and Islets in the Stream},
author = {Nagel, Sidney},
abstractNote = {The exhilarating spray from waves crashing into the shore, the distressing sound of a faucet leaking in the night, and the indispensable role of bubbles dissolving gas into the oceans are but a few examples of the ubiquitous presence and profound importance of drop formation and splashing in our lives. During fission, a fluid forms a neck that becomes vanishingly thin at the point of breakup. This topological transition is accompanied by a dynamic singularity in which physical properties such as pressure diverge. Singularities of this sort often organize the overall dynamical evolution of nonlinear systems. I will first discuss the role of singularities in the breakup of droplets. I will then present a second experiment, selective withdrawal, in which we study the steady-state shape of a liquid as it is withdrawn by a nozzle through a surrounding fluid. Here, a change in topology may again be accompanied by a singularity. Applications of this geometry that rely on singular dynamical behavior are relevant for the coating of biological particles that may be of particular use in medical transplantation technologies.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Wed Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
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