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Title: Abrasion Resistant Ultrahydrophobic Coatings

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Luna Innovations Incorporated
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1014760
Report Number(s):
DOE SBIR Phase I Final Report
1358.01
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-06ER84546
Type / Phase:
SBIR
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Hydrophobic, abrasion resistant, wind turbine, wind energy, antifouling, coating

Citation Formats

Hirsch, Marc. Abrasion Resistant Ultrahydrophobic Coatings. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Hirsch, Marc. Abrasion Resistant Ultrahydrophobic Coatings. United States.
Hirsch, Marc. Tue . "Abrasion Resistant Ultrahydrophobic Coatings". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1014760,
title = {Abrasion Resistant Ultrahydrophobic Coatings},
author = {Hirsch, Marc},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 27 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue Mar 27 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

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  • Abrasion and impact resistance are a prime requirement for many materials applications. To best protect plastic or metal-based composites from abrasion and impact, a surface coating that is simultaneously very hard and highly yielding is necessary. Both these requirements can be met by a dense pattern of emergent fibers or high L/D ratios, well rooted but with one end free, i.e., hair. A covering of such hair, with fibers long enough to accommodate themselves to impacting objects, will give substantial protection against impact or particle abrasion. 1 tab.
  • We have proven that a layer of reinforcing filaments emerging out of the surface of a composite provides it with substantial protection from abrasion and impact. We have determined the geometrical constraints on fiber diameter, length, root depths, orientation, and packing density required for this protection. Substantial performance has been demonstrated for even incompletely optimized systems. We are in the process of extending this technology to first aluminum and then steel structural metal protection. Pretreatment and assembly methods for such materials have been developed, including at least one suitable for a mass production environment.
  • Abrasion and impact resistance are a prime requirement for many materials applications. To best protect plastic of metal-based composites from abrasion and impact, a surface coating that is simultaneously very hard and highly yielding is necessary. Both these requirements can be met by a dense pattern of emergent fibers of high L/D ration, well rooted but with one and free, i.e., hair. A covering of such hair, with fibers long enough to bend over, dense enough for mutual shielding but thin enough to accommodate themselves to impacting objects, will give substantial protection against impact or particle abrasion.
  • The study of the application of free filamentary composites in ''pile''-like structures and linings is aimed at cost effective alternatives to the life limiting abrasive and galling wear experienced in solid member flow systems and system elements. The basic approach is to reduce the intensity of interaction between flowing fluid and container to a level which results in little or no abrasive or fretting wear. In the case of flow borne particulates especially, the objective is to select filament materials and geometries which singly and in composite are sufficiently strong to preclude single particle (event) failure but sufficiently flexible tomore » allow essentially damage-free passage. Early evidence is that this condition is primarily dependent on particle energy and filament strength, although there may also be fatigue, especially acoustic involvement. Our thinking to date has been on wear and acoustic fatigue resistant linings for conduit, flow control, particle control, and separation and drag resistant sealing. Both analytic and test studies have been undertaken. Initial work has been aimed at direct determination of basic characteristics of drag and damage threshold. 3 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • A survey of abrasion resistant materials is presented. Sections are included on abrasion-resistant cast steels, abrasion-resistant wrought steels, alloy white irons, composite abrasion-resistant castings, grinding media, and development prospects. (JRD)