skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine

Abstract

This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
American Coll. of Nuclear Physicians, Washington, DC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10147566
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/60936-T1
ON: DE93010846
DOE Contract Number:
FG05-90ER60936
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 2 Feb 1990
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; BILIARY TRACT; SKELETON; HEART; 550602; EXTERNAL RADIATION IN DIAGNOSTICS

Citation Formats

Not Available. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.2172/10147566.
Not Available. NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine. United States. doi:10.2172/10147566.
Not Available. 1990. "NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine". United States. doi:10.2172/10147566. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10147566.
@article{osti_10147566,
title = {NMR clinical imaging and spectroscopy: Its impact on nuclear medicine},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not? by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.},
doi = {10.2172/10147566},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 2
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share:
  • This is a collection of four papers describing aspects of past and future use of nuclear magnetic resonance as a clinical diagnostic tool. The four papers are entitled (1) What Does NMR Offer that Nuclear Medicine Does Not by Jerry W. Froelich, (2) Oncological Imaging: Now, Future and Impact Jerry W. Froelich, (3) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine: Past, Present and Future by H. Cecil Charles, and (4) MR Cardiology: Now, Future and Impact by Robert J. Herfkens.
  • This study is designed to determine the efficacy of nuclear medicine procedures in clinical practice. Several methods of determining efficacy will be evaluated to determine those most suitable. Nuclear medicine methods will be confined to the study of lung diseases by pulmonary perfusion and ventilation. In addition to evaluating the above methods data will be obtained to determine the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and efficiency of the test under consideration. These values, corrected for prevalence of the disease processes under consideration will then be compared to the values obtained by the MACRO and MICRO methods and will help to boundmore » the clinical reliability of the diagnostic method depending on the degree to which the several methods trend together. Depending on the practicality of these two methods, in addition to the determination of efficacy, cost effectiveness factors and benefit-risk estimates which are used to apply to radiation effects will be determined for nuclear medicine studies of the brain, bone, heart, liver and thyroid subsequently. The measurement techniques will then be utilized to establish guidelines for the most useful applications of the given procedure so that clinicians will be able to obtain a pretest estimate of the utility of the nuclear medicine test.« less