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Title: Apportionment of Ambient Primary and Secondary Fine Particulate Matter at the Pittsburgh National Energy Laboratory Particulate Matter Characterization Site Using Positive Matrix Factorization and a Potential Source Contributions Function Analysis

Abstract

Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations associated with 202 24-hr samples collected at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) particulate matter (PM) characterization site in south Pittsburgh from October 1999 through September 2001 were used to apportion PM2.5 into primary and secondary contributions using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2). Input included the concentrations of PM2.5 mass determined with a Federal Reference Method (FRM) sampler, semi-volatile PM2.5, organic material, elemental carbon (EC), and trace element components of PM2.5. A total of 11 factors were identified. The results of potential source contributions function (PSCF) analysis using PMF2 factors and HYSPLIT-calculated back-trajectories were used to identify those factors associated with specific meteorological transport conditions. The 11 factors were identified as being associated with emissions from various specific regions and facilities including crustal material, gasoline combustion, diesel combustion, and three nearby sources high in trace metals. Three sources associated with transport from coal-fired power plants to the southeast, a combination of point sources to the northwest, and a steel mill and associated sources to the west were identified. In addition, two secondary-material-dominated sources were identified, one was associated with secondary products of local emissions and one was dominated by secondary ammonium sulfate transported to the NETLmore » site from the west and southwest. Of these 11 factors, the four largest contributors to PM2.5, were the secondary transported material (dominated by ammonium sulfate) (47%), local secondary material (19%), diesel combustion emissions (10%), and gasoline combustion emissions (8%). The other seven factors accounted for the remaining 16% of the PM2.5 mass. The findings are consistent with the major source of PM2.5 in the Pittsburgh area being dominated by ammonium sulfate from distant transport and so decoupled from local activity emitting organic pollutants in the metropolitan area. In contrast, the major local secondary sources are dominated by organic material.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [5]
  1. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)
  2. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA
  3. Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States). Center for Air Resources Engineering and Science, and Dept. of Chemical Engineering
  4. Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Statistics
  5. Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, Morgantown, WV, and Albany, OR (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1014733
Report Number(s):
NETL-TPR-1527
Journal ID: ISSN 1047-3289
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 58; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1047-3289
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Martello, Donald, Pekney, Natalie, Anderson, Richard, Davidson, Cliff, Hopke, Philip, Kim, Eugene, Christensen, William, Mangelson, Nolan, and Eatough, Delbert. Apportionment of Ambient Primary and Secondary Fine Particulate Matter at the Pittsburgh National Energy Laboratory Particulate Matter Characterization Site Using Positive Matrix Factorization and a Potential Source Contributions Function Analysis. United States: N. p., 2008. Web. doi:10.3155/1047-3289.58.3.357.
Martello, Donald, Pekney, Natalie, Anderson, Richard, Davidson, Cliff, Hopke, Philip, Kim, Eugene, Christensen, William, Mangelson, Nolan, & Eatough, Delbert. Apportionment of Ambient Primary and Secondary Fine Particulate Matter at the Pittsburgh National Energy Laboratory Particulate Matter Characterization Site Using Positive Matrix Factorization and a Potential Source Contributions Function Analysis. United States. https://doi.org/10.3155/1047-3289.58.3.357
Martello, Donald, Pekney, Natalie, Anderson, Richard, Davidson, Cliff, Hopke, Philip, Kim, Eugene, Christensen, William, Mangelson, Nolan, and Eatough, Delbert. Sat . "Apportionment of Ambient Primary and Secondary Fine Particulate Matter at the Pittsburgh National Energy Laboratory Particulate Matter Characterization Site Using Positive Matrix Factorization and a Potential Source Contributions Function Analysis". United States. https://doi.org/10.3155/1047-3289.58.3.357.
@article{osti_1014733,
title = {Apportionment of Ambient Primary and Secondary Fine Particulate Matter at the Pittsburgh National Energy Laboratory Particulate Matter Characterization Site Using Positive Matrix Factorization and a Potential Source Contributions Function Analysis},
author = {Martello, Donald and Pekney, Natalie and Anderson, Richard and Davidson, Cliff and Hopke, Philip and Kim, Eugene and Christensen, William and Mangelson, Nolan and Eatough, Delbert},
abstractNote = {Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) concentrations associated with 202 24-hr samples collected at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) particulate matter (PM) characterization site in south Pittsburgh from October 1999 through September 2001 were used to apportion PM2.5 into primary and secondary contributions using Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2). Input included the concentrations of PM2.5 mass determined with a Federal Reference Method (FRM) sampler, semi-volatile PM2.5, organic material, elemental carbon (EC), and trace element components of PM2.5. A total of 11 factors were identified. The results of potential source contributions function (PSCF) analysis using PMF2 factors and HYSPLIT-calculated back-trajectories were used to identify those factors associated with specific meteorological transport conditions. The 11 factors were identified as being associated with emissions from various specific regions and facilities including crustal material, gasoline combustion, diesel combustion, and three nearby sources high in trace metals. Three sources associated with transport from coal-fired power plants to the southeast, a combination of point sources to the northwest, and a steel mill and associated sources to the west were identified. In addition, two secondary-material-dominated sources were identified, one was associated with secondary products of local emissions and one was dominated by secondary ammonium sulfate transported to the NETL site from the west and southwest. Of these 11 factors, the four largest contributors to PM2.5, were the secondary transported material (dominated by ammonium sulfate) (47%), local secondary material (19%), diesel combustion emissions (10%), and gasoline combustion emissions (8%). The other seven factors accounted for the remaining 16% of the PM2.5 mass. The findings are consistent with the major source of PM2.5 in the Pittsburgh area being dominated by ammonium sulfate from distant transport and so decoupled from local activity emitting organic pollutants in the metropolitan area. In contrast, the major local secondary sources are dominated by organic material.},
doi = {10.3155/1047-3289.58.3.357},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1014733}, journal = {Journal of the Air and Waste Management Association},
issn = {1047-3289},
number = 3,
volume = 58,
place = {United States},
year = {2008},
month = {3}
}