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Title: Wind versus Biofuels for Addressing Climate, Health, and Energy

Abstract

The favored approach today for addressing global warming is to promote a variety of options: biofuels, wind, solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, geothermal, hydroelectric, and nuclear energy and to improve efficiency. However, by far, most emphasis has been on biofuels. It is shown here, though, that current-technology biofuels cannot address global warming and may slightly increase death and illness due to ozone-related air pollution. Future biofuels may theoretically slow global warming, but only temporarily and with the cost of increased air pollution mortality. In both cases, the land required renders biofuels an impractical solution. Recent measurements and statistical analyses of U.S. and world wind power carried out at Stanford University suggest that wind combined with other options can substantially address global warming, air pollution mortality, and energy needs simultaneously.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1014191
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: SLAC Colloquium Series, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California, presented on January 29, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; 17 WIND ENERGY; AIR POLLUTION; BIOFUELS; DEATH; EFFICIENCY; FERMILAB ACCELERATOR; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; MORTALITY; NUCLEAR ENERGY; STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER; WIND POWER

Citation Formats

Jacobson, Mark Z. Wind versus Biofuels for Addressing Climate, Health, and Energy. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Jacobson, Mark Z. Wind versus Biofuels for Addressing Climate, Health, and Energy. United States.
Jacobson, Mark Z. Mon . "Wind versus Biofuels for Addressing Climate, Health, and Energy". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1014191.
@article{osti_1014191,
title = {Wind versus Biofuels for Addressing Climate, Health, and Energy},
author = {Jacobson, Mark Z.},
abstractNote = {The favored approach today for addressing global warming is to promote a variety of options: biofuels, wind, solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, geothermal, hydroelectric, and nuclear energy and to improve efficiency. However, by far, most emphasis has been on biofuels. It is shown here, though, that current-technology biofuels cannot address global warming and may slightly increase death and illness due to ozone-related air pollution. Future biofuels may theoretically slow global warming, but only temporarily and with the cost of increased air pollution mortality. In both cases, the land required renders biofuels an impractical solution. Recent measurements and statistical analyses of U.S. and world wind power carried out at Stanford University suggest that wind combined with other options can substantially address global warming, air pollution mortality, and energy needs simultaneously.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 29 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 29 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}
  • The favored approach today for addressing global warming is to promote a variety of options: biofuels, wind, solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, geothermal, hydroelectric, and nuclear energy and to improve efficiency. However, by far, most emphasis has been on biofuels. It is shown here, though, that current-technology biofuels cannot address global warming and may slightly increase death and illness due to ozone-related air pollution. Future biofuels may theoretically slow global warming, but only temporarily and with the cost of increased air pollution mortality. In both cases, the land required renders biofuels an impractical solution. Recent measurements and statistical analyses of U.S.more » and world wind power carried out at Stanford University suggest that wind combined with other options can substantially address global warming, air pollution mortality, and energy needs simultaneously.« less
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