skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration

Abstract

The costs and the time scales of colliders intended to reach the energy frontier are such that it is important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators a drive beam, either laser or particle, produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultra-high accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. More than 42 GeV energy gain was achieved in an 85 cm long plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a 42 GeV electron drive beam in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility at SLAC. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx}52 GV/m. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3 km long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. Prospects for a drive-witness bunch configuration andmore » high-gradient positron acceleration experiments planned for the SABER facility will be discussed.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1014171
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: SLAC Colloquium Series, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California, presented on March 19, 2007
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATION; ACCELERATORS; CHARGED PARTICLES; CONFIGURATION; ELECTRONS; FERMILAB ACCELERATOR; LASERS; METERS; PLASMA; PLASMA ACCELERATION; PLASMA GUNS; PLASMA WAVES; POSITRONS; STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER; WAKEFIELD ACCELERATORS

Citation Formats

Hogan, Mark. Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Hogan, Mark. Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration. United States.
Hogan, Mark. Mon . "Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1014171.
@article{osti_1014171,
title = {Recent Advances in Plasma Acceleration},
author = {Hogan, Mark},
abstractNote = {The costs and the time scales of colliders intended to reach the energy frontier are such that it is important to explore new methods of accelerating particles to high energies. Plasma-based accelerators are particularly attractive because they are capable of producing accelerating fields that are orders of magnitude larger than those used in conventional colliders. In these accelerators a drive beam, either laser or particle, produces a plasma wave (wakefield) that accelerates charged particles. The ultimate utility of plasma accelerators will depend on sustaining ultra-high accelerating fields over a substantial length to achieve a significant energy gain. More than 42 GeV energy gain was achieved in an 85 cm long plasma wakefield accelerator driven by a 42 GeV electron drive beam in the Final Focus Test Beam (FFTB) Facility at SLAC. Most of the beam electrons lose energy to the plasma wave, but some electrons in the back of the same beam pulse are accelerated with a field of {approx}52 GV/m. This effectively doubles their energy, producing the energy gain of the 3 km long SLAC accelerator in less than a meter for a small fraction of the electrons in the injected bunch. Prospects for a drive-witness bunch configuration and high-gradient positron acceleration experiments planned for the SABER facility will be discussed.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 19 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Mar 19 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
  • Our understanding of the dynamics of growing crystals is remarkably primitive, and it is generally not possible to explain why even ordinary crystals develop their characteristic shapes. A case in point is the snow crystal (a.k.a. snowflake), which grows into a puzzling variety of unusual morphologies under different conditions. Although snow crystals result from a simple phase transition, some basic aspects of their growth have remained unexplained - even at a qualitative level - for over 75 years. Come to this talk and see snowflakes like you've never seen them before, find out how to grow electric ice needles inmore » the lab, and learn what this all means for the fundamental physics of crystal growth and pattern formation. (For a preview, see SnowCrystals.com.)« less
  • Neurosurgical procedures require precise planning and intraoperative support. Recent advances in image guided technology have provided neurosurgeons with improved navigational support for more effective and safer procedures. A number of exemplary cases will be presented.
  • A simulation of laser-plasma acceleration in the boosted frame of the wake, moving at near lightspeed. Space has contracted and time has stretched, separating events in time. Relatively few time steps are needed to model them, requiring less computer time.
  • A simulation of laser-plasma acceleration in the laboratory frame. Both the laser and the wakefield buckets must be resolved over the entire domain of the plasma, requiring many cells and many time steps. While researchers often use a simulation window that moves with the pulse, this reduces only the multitude of cells, not the multitude of time steps. For an artistic impression of how to solve the simulation by using the boosted-frame method, watch the video "Modeling laser-plasma acceleration in the wakefield frame."
  • Plasma wakefield acceleration is one of the most promising approaches to advancing accelerator technology. This approach offers a potential 1,000-fold or more increase in acceleration over a given distance, compared to existing accelerators.  FACET, enabled by the Recovery Act funds, will study plasma acceleration, using short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons. In this lecture, the physics of plasma acceleration and features of FACET will be presented.