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Title: [Regulation of terpene metabolism]. Annual progress report, March 15, 1989--March 14, 1990

Abstract

Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C{sub 10}) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C{sub 15} C{sub 20}, C{sub 30}, C{sub 40}) within the oilmore » glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C{sub 15}) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. of Biological Chemistry
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10136675
Report Number(s):
DOE/ER/13869-2
ON: DE93010767
DOE Contract Number:  
FG06-88ER13869
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 9 Nov 1989
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; TERPENES; BIOSYNTHESIS; ESSENTIAL OILS; PROGRESS REPORT; CARBON 14 COMPOUNDS; TRACER TECHNIQUES; TISSUE CULTURES; CAMPHOR; SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTION; BIOLOGICAL PATHWAYS; 090700; 550201; 550501; RESOURCES

Citation Formats

Croteau, R. [Regulation of terpene metabolism]. Annual progress report, March 15, 1989--March 14, 1990. United States: N. p., 1989. Web. doi:10.2172/10136675.
Croteau, R. [Regulation of terpene metabolism]. Annual progress report, March 15, 1989--March 14, 1990. United States. doi:10.2172/10136675.
Croteau, R. Thu . "[Regulation of terpene metabolism]. Annual progress report, March 15, 1989--March 14, 1990". United States. doi:10.2172/10136675. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10136675.
@article{osti_10136675,
title = {[Regulation of terpene metabolism]. Annual progress report, March 15, 1989--March 14, 1990},
author = {Croteau, R},
abstractNote = {Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C{sub 10}) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C{sub 15} C{sub 20}, C{sub 30}, C{sub 40}) within the oil glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C{sub 15}) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.},
doi = {10.2172/10136675},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1989},
month = {11}
}