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Title: Literature review on the use of bioaccumulation for heavy metal removal and recovery. Volume 2

Abstract

Bioaccumulation of metals by microbes -- `` bioremoval`` -- is a powerful new technology for the concentration, recovery, and removal of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from waste streams and contaminated environments. Algae are particularly well suited for metal bioremoval. A recent commercial application of bioremoval utilizes inert (dead) immobilized microalgae biomass as ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metals from industrial waste waters. Also, living microalgal cultures have been used to remove metals from mine effluents. Microbial cells and biomass can bioaccumulate metals and radionuclides by a large variety of mechanisms, both dependent and independent of cell metabolism. Microbial cell walls can act as ion exchange and metal complexation agents. Heavy metals can precipitate and even crystallize on cell surfaces. Metabolically produced hydrogen sulfide or other metabolic products can bioprecipitate heavy metals. Many microbes produce both intra- and extracellular metal complexing agents which could be considered in practical metal removal processes. Bioremoval processes are greatly affected by the microbial species and even strain used, pH, redox potential, temperature, and other conditions under which the microbes are grown. Development of practical applications of bioremoval requires applies research using the particular waste solutions to be treated, or close simulationsmore » thereof. From a practical perspective, the selection of the microbial biomass and the process for contacting the microbial biomass with the metal containing solutions are the key issues. Much of the recent commercial R&D has emphasized commercially available, inert, microbial biomass sources as these can be acquired in sufficient quantities at affordable costs. The fundamental research and practical applications of bioaccumulation by microalgae suggests these organisms warrant a high priority in the development of advanced bioremoval processes.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Benemann (J.R.), Pinole, CA (United States)
  2. Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10132654
Report Number(s):
WSRC-TR-90-175-Vol.2
ON: DE92010199
DOE Contract Number:  
AC09-89SR18035
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Feb 1991
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; METALS; REMOVAL; WASTE WATER; WATER TREATMENT; DEMETALLIZATION; MICROORGANISMS; DETOXIFICATION; RADIOISOTOPES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; ION EXCHANGE; EFFICIENCY; ZINC; CADMIUM; MERCURY; ALGAE; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES; TOXICITY; PROTEINS; SOLIDIFICATION; 052001; 550700; WASTE PROCESSING; MICROBIOLOGY

Citation Formats

Benemann, J R, and Wilde, E W. Literature review on the use of bioaccumulation for heavy metal removal and recovery. Volume 2. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.2172/10132654.
Benemann, J R, & Wilde, E W. Literature review on the use of bioaccumulation for heavy metal removal and recovery. Volume 2. United States. doi:10.2172/10132654.
Benemann, J R, and Wilde, E W. Fri . "Literature review on the use of bioaccumulation for heavy metal removal and recovery. Volume 2". United States. doi:10.2172/10132654. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10132654.
@article{osti_10132654,
title = {Literature review on the use of bioaccumulation for heavy metal removal and recovery. Volume 2},
author = {Benemann, J R and Wilde, E W},
abstractNote = {Bioaccumulation of metals by microbes -- `` bioremoval`` -- is a powerful new technology for the concentration, recovery, and removal of toxic heavy metals and radionuclides from waste streams and contaminated environments. Algae are particularly well suited for metal bioremoval. A recent commercial application of bioremoval utilizes inert (dead) immobilized microalgae biomass as ion exchange materials for the removal of heavy metals from industrial waste waters. Also, living microalgal cultures have been used to remove metals from mine effluents. Microbial cells and biomass can bioaccumulate metals and radionuclides by a large variety of mechanisms, both dependent and independent of cell metabolism. Microbial cell walls can act as ion exchange and metal complexation agents. Heavy metals can precipitate and even crystallize on cell surfaces. Metabolically produced hydrogen sulfide or other metabolic products can bioprecipitate heavy metals. Many microbes produce both intra- and extracellular metal complexing agents which could be considered in practical metal removal processes. Bioremoval processes are greatly affected by the microbial species and even strain used, pH, redox potential, temperature, and other conditions under which the microbes are grown. Development of practical applications of bioremoval requires applies research using the particular waste solutions to be treated, or close simulations thereof. From a practical perspective, the selection of the microbial biomass and the process for contacting the microbial biomass with the metal containing solutions are the key issues. Much of the recent commercial R&D has emphasized commercially available, inert, microbial biomass sources as these can be acquired in sufficient quantities at affordable costs. The fundamental research and practical applications of bioaccumulation by microalgae suggests these organisms warrant a high priority in the development of advanced bioremoval processes.},
doi = {10.2172/10132654},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1991},
month = {2}
}