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Title: Electromagnetic pulse research on electric power systems: Program summary and recommendations. Power Systems Technology Program

Abstract

A single nuclear detonation several hundred kilometers above the central United States will subject much of the nation to a high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (BENT). This pulse consists of an intense steep-front, short-duration transient electromagnetic field, followed by a geomagnetic disturbance with tens of seconds duration. This latter environment is referred to as the magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (NMENT). Both the early-time transient and the geomagnetic disturbance could impact the operation of the nation`s power systems. Since 1983, the US Department of Energy has been actively pursuing a research program to assess the potential impacts of one or more BENT events on the nation`s electric energy supply. This report summarizes the results of that program and provides recommendations for enhancing power system reliability under HENT conditions. A nominal HENP environment suitable for assessing geographically large systems was developed during the program and is briefly described in this report. This environment was used to provide a realistic indication of BEMP impacts on electric power systems. It was found that a single high-altitude burst, which could significantly disturb the geomagnetic field, may cause the interconnected power network to break up into utility islands with massive power failures in some areas. However, permanent damage wouldmore » be isolated, and restoration should be possible within a few hours. Multiple bursts would likely increase the blackout areas, component failures, and restoration time. However, a long-term blackout of many months is unlikely because major power system components, such as transformers, are not likely to be damaged by the nominal HEND environment. Moreover, power system reliability, under both HENT and normal operating conditions, can be enhanced by simple, and often low cost, modifications to current utility practices.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
  2. Tesche (F.M.), Dallas, TX (United States)
  3. Vance (E.F.), Fort Worth, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10131917
Report Number(s):
ORNL-6708
ON: DE93006956
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jan 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS; BLAST EFFECTS; ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSES; MITIGATION; NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS; POWER SYSTEMS; VULNERABILITY; DETONATIONS; PHYSICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS; RECOMMENDATIONS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; 450400; 240200; NUCLEAR AND RADIOLOGICAL WARFARE; POWER SYSTEM NETWORKS, TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION

Citation Formats

Barnes, P.R., McConnell, B.W., Van Dyke, J.W., Tesche, F.M., and Vance, E.F. Electromagnetic pulse research on electric power systems: Program summary and recommendations. Power Systems Technology Program. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.2172/10131917.
Barnes, P.R., McConnell, B.W., Van Dyke, J.W., Tesche, F.M., & Vance, E.F. Electromagnetic pulse research on electric power systems: Program summary and recommendations. Power Systems Technology Program. United States. doi:10.2172/10131917.
Barnes, P.R., McConnell, B.W., Van Dyke, J.W., Tesche, F.M., and Vance, E.F. Fri . "Electromagnetic pulse research on electric power systems: Program summary and recommendations. Power Systems Technology Program". United States. doi:10.2172/10131917. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10131917.
@article{osti_10131917,
title = {Electromagnetic pulse research on electric power systems: Program summary and recommendations. Power Systems Technology Program},
author = {Barnes, P.R. and McConnell, B.W. and Van Dyke, J.W. and Tesche, F.M. and Vance, E.F.},
abstractNote = {A single nuclear detonation several hundred kilometers above the central United States will subject much of the nation to a high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (BENT). This pulse consists of an intense steep-front, short-duration transient electromagnetic field, followed by a geomagnetic disturbance with tens of seconds duration. This latter environment is referred to as the magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulse (NMENT). Both the early-time transient and the geomagnetic disturbance could impact the operation of the nation`s power systems. Since 1983, the US Department of Energy has been actively pursuing a research program to assess the potential impacts of one or more BENT events on the nation`s electric energy supply. This report summarizes the results of that program and provides recommendations for enhancing power system reliability under HENT conditions. A nominal HENP environment suitable for assessing geographically large systems was developed during the program and is briefly described in this report. This environment was used to provide a realistic indication of BEMP impacts on electric power systems. It was found that a single high-altitude burst, which could significantly disturb the geomagnetic field, may cause the interconnected power network to break up into utility islands with massive power failures in some areas. However, permanent damage would be isolated, and restoration should be possible within a few hours. Multiple bursts would likely increase the blackout areas, component failures, and restoration time. However, a long-term blackout of many months is unlikely because major power system components, such as transformers, are not likely to be damaged by the nominal HEND environment. Moreover, power system reliability, under both HENT and normal operating conditions, can be enhanced by simple, and often low cost, modifications to current utility practices.},
doi = {10.2172/10131917},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1993},
month = {1}
}