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Title: Stability analysis of large electric power systems

Abstract

Modern electric power systems are large and complicated, and, in many regions of the world, the generation and transmission systems are operating near their limits. Ensuring the reliable operation of the power system requires engineers to study the response of the system to various disturbances. The responses to large disturbances are examined by numerically solving the nonlinear differential-algebraic equations describing the power system. The response to small disturbances is typically studied via eigenanalysis. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) recently developed the Extended Transient/Mid-term Stability Program (ETMSP) to study large disturbance stability and the Small Signal Stability Program Package (SSSP) to study small signal stability. The primary objectives of the work described in this report were to (1) explore ways of speeding up ETMSP, especially on mid-term voltage stability problems, (2) explore ways of speeding up the Multi-Area Small-Signal Stability program (MASS), one of the codes in SSSP, and (3) explore ways of increasing the size of problem that can be solved by the Cray version of MASS.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10127614
Report Number(s):
PNL-8495
ON: DE93007463
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jan 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; POWER SYSTEMS; STABILITY; SYSTEMS ANALYSIS; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; TRANSIENTS; DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS; EVALUATION; ALGORITHMS; SUPERCOMPUTERS; 420200; FACILITIES, EQUIPMENT, AND TECHNIQUES

Citation Formats

Elwood, D.M.. Stability analysis of large electric power systems. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.2172/10127614.
Elwood, D.M.. Stability analysis of large electric power systems. United States. doi:10.2172/10127614.
Elwood, D.M.. 1993. "Stability analysis of large electric power systems". United States. doi:10.2172/10127614. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10127614.
@article{osti_10127614,
title = {Stability analysis of large electric power systems},
author = {Elwood, D.M.},
abstractNote = {Modern electric power systems are large and complicated, and, in many regions of the world, the generation and transmission systems are operating near their limits. Ensuring the reliable operation of the power system requires engineers to study the response of the system to various disturbances. The responses to large disturbances are examined by numerically solving the nonlinear differential-algebraic equations describing the power system. The response to small disturbances is typically studied via eigenanalysis. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) recently developed the Extended Transient/Mid-term Stability Program (ETMSP) to study large disturbance stability and the Small Signal Stability Program Package (SSSP) to study small signal stability. The primary objectives of the work described in this report were to (1) explore ways of speeding up ETMSP, especially on mid-term voltage stability problems, (2) explore ways of speeding up the Multi-Area Small-Signal Stability program (MASS), one of the codes in SSSP, and (3) explore ways of increasing the size of problem that can be solved by the Cray version of MASS.},
doi = {10.2172/10127614},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:

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  • Modern electric power systems are large and complicated, and, in many regions of the world, the generation and transmission systems are operating near their limits. Ensuring the reliable operation of the power system requires engineers to study the response of the system to various disturbances. The responses to large disturbances are examined by numerically solving the nonlinear differential-algebraic equations describing the power system. The response to small disturbances is typically studied via eigenanalysis. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) recently developed the Extended Transient/Mid-term Stability Program (ETMSP) to study large disturbance stability and the Small Signal Stability Program Package (SSSP)more » to study small signal stability. The primary objectives of the work described in this report were to (1) explore ways of speeding up ETMSP, especially on mid-term voltage stability problems, (2) explore ways of speeding up the Multi-Area Small-Signal Stability program (MASS), one of the codes in SSSP, and (3) explore ways of increasing the size of problem that can be solved by the Cray version of MASS.« less
  • While direct methods of analyzing power systems provide several functional advantages over traditional methods, some limitations on their use remain. Increasing utilization of existing generation and transmission systems is forcing energy companies to operate power systems closer to their physical limits. EPRI teamed up with Cornell University`s School of Engineering to develop a generic network-preserving, transient stability model and a new network-preserving, transient stability model with the intent of removing some of the limitations of direct methods. The team developed analytical tools, the network-preserving transient stability models, reliable and efficient computational procedures, a new methodology, and a theoretical basis formore » direct methods, all of which significantly overcame accuracy and reliability limitations of direct methods. Research needs include extension of the functionality of direct methods to solution of voltage-dip problems and further modeling improvements, including appropriate dynamic load modeling.« less
  • Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptualmore » designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.« less
  • This report describes eigenvalue calculations for a large electric power system using the computer program AESOPS. This work was undertaken to provide program testing and acquire experience in program application to large systems. Data is supplied by the Electric Power Research Institute. Study results include descriptions of six modes of oscillation which involve numerous generators. Considerable emphasis is given to study procedures, including methods of deriving equivalent system models of reduced dimensions. The effects of power system stabilizers on damping is calculated for each of the six modes studied in detail.