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Title: Molecular Environmental Science and Synchrotron Radiation Facilities An Update of the 1995 DOE-Airlie Report on Molecular Environmental Science

Abstract

This workshop was requested by Dr. Robert Marianelli, Director of the DOE-BES Chemical Sciences Division, to update the findings of the Workshop on Molecular Environmental Sciences (MES) held at Airlie, VA, in July 1995. The Airlie Workshop Report defined the new interdisciplinary field referred to as Molecular Environmental Science (MES), reviewed the synchrotron radiation methods used in MES research, assessed the adequacy of synchrotron radiation facilities for research in this field, and summarized the beam time requirements of MES users based on a national MES user survey. The objectives of MES research are to provide information on the chemical and physical forms (speciation), spatial distribution, and reactivity of contaminants in natural materials and man-made waste forms, and to develop a fundamental understanding of the complex molecular-scale environmental processes, both chemical and biological, that affect the stability, transformations, mobility, and toxicity of contaminant species. These objectives require parallel studies of ''real'' environmental samples, which are complicated multi-phase mixtures with chemical and physical heterogeneities, and of simplified model systems in which variables can be controlled and fundamental processes can be examined. Only by this combination of approaches can a basic understanding of environmental processes at the molecular-scale be achieved.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (US)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research (ER) (US)
OSTI Identifier:
10127
Report Number(s):
SLAC-R-517
TRN: US0103363
DOE Contract Number:  
AC03-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 7 May 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; ENVIRONMENTAL MATERIALS; MOLECULAR BIOLOGY; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; SYNCHROTRON RADIATION; TOXICITY; WASTES; POLLUTANTS

Citation Formats

Bargar, John R. Molecular Environmental Science and Synchrotron Radiation Facilities An Update of the 1995 DOE-Airlie Report on Molecular Environmental Science. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.2172/10127.
Bargar, John R. Molecular Environmental Science and Synchrotron Radiation Facilities An Update of the 1995 DOE-Airlie Report on Molecular Environmental Science. United States. doi:10.2172/10127.
Bargar, John R. Fri . "Molecular Environmental Science and Synchrotron Radiation Facilities An Update of the 1995 DOE-Airlie Report on Molecular Environmental Science". United States. doi:10.2172/10127. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10127.
@article{osti_10127,
title = {Molecular Environmental Science and Synchrotron Radiation Facilities An Update of the 1995 DOE-Airlie Report on Molecular Environmental Science},
author = {Bargar, John R},
abstractNote = {This workshop was requested by Dr. Robert Marianelli, Director of the DOE-BES Chemical Sciences Division, to update the findings of the Workshop on Molecular Environmental Sciences (MES) held at Airlie, VA, in July 1995. The Airlie Workshop Report defined the new interdisciplinary field referred to as Molecular Environmental Science (MES), reviewed the synchrotron radiation methods used in MES research, assessed the adequacy of synchrotron radiation facilities for research in this field, and summarized the beam time requirements of MES users based on a national MES user survey. The objectives of MES research are to provide information on the chemical and physical forms (speciation), spatial distribution, and reactivity of contaminants in natural materials and man-made waste forms, and to develop a fundamental understanding of the complex molecular-scale environmental processes, both chemical and biological, that affect the stability, transformations, mobility, and toxicity of contaminant species. These objectives require parallel studies of ''real'' environmental samples, which are complicated multi-phase mixtures with chemical and physical heterogeneities, and of simplified model systems in which variables can be controlled and fundamental processes can be examined. Only by this combination of approaches can a basic understanding of environmental processes at the molecular-scale be achieved.},
doi = {10.2172/10127},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {5}
}

Technical Report:

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