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Title: Vegetation communities associated with the 100-Area and 200-Area facilities on the Hanford Site

Abstract

The Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, lies within the broad semi-arid shrub-steppe vegetation zone of the Columbia Basin. Thirteen different habitat types on the Hanford Site have been mapped in Habitat Types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and Plant Species of Concern (Downs et al. 1993). In a broad sense, this classification is correct. On a smaller scale, however, finer delineations are possible. This study was conducted to determine the plant communities and estimate vegetation cover in and directly adjacent to the 100 and 200 Areas, primarily in relation to waste sites, as part of a comprehensive ecological study for the Compensation Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) characterization of the 100 and 200 Areas. During the summer of 1993, field surveys were conducted and a map of vegetation communities in each area, including dominant species associations, was produced. The field surveys consisted of qualitative community delineations. The community delineations described were made by field reconnaissance and are qualitative in nature. The delineations were made by visually determining the dominant plant species or vegetation types and were based on the species most apparent at the time of inspection. Additionally, 38 transects were run in these plant communities to trymore » to obtain a more accurate representation of the community. Because habitat disturbances from construction/operations activities continue to occur in these areas, users of this information should be cautious in applying these maps without a current ground survey. This work will complement large-scale habitat maps of the Hanford Site.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10124588
Report Number(s):
WHC-SD-EN-TI-216
ON: DE94006993; BR: 35AF11201/35AF11202; TRN: 94:008439
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-87RL10930
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 17 Jan 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; HANFORD RESERVATION; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS; SOILS; MIGRATION; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; PLANTS; GROUND TRUTH; COMPILED DATA; 540250; 540230; SITE RESOURCE AND USE STUDIES; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS MONITORING AND TRANSPORT

Citation Formats

Stegen, J.A. Vegetation communities associated with the 100-Area and 200-Area facilities on the Hanford Site. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.2172/10124588.
Stegen, J.A. Vegetation communities associated with the 100-Area and 200-Area facilities on the Hanford Site. United States. doi:10.2172/10124588.
Stegen, J.A. Mon . "Vegetation communities associated with the 100-Area and 200-Area facilities on the Hanford Site". United States. doi:10.2172/10124588. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10124588.
@article{osti_10124588,
title = {Vegetation communities associated with the 100-Area and 200-Area facilities on the Hanford Site},
author = {Stegen, J.A.},
abstractNote = {The Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington, lies within the broad semi-arid shrub-steppe vegetation zone of the Columbia Basin. Thirteen different habitat types on the Hanford Site have been mapped in Habitat Types on the Hanford Site: Wildlife and Plant Species of Concern (Downs et al. 1993). In a broad sense, this classification is correct. On a smaller scale, however, finer delineations are possible. This study was conducted to determine the plant communities and estimate vegetation cover in and directly adjacent to the 100 and 200 Areas, primarily in relation to waste sites, as part of a comprehensive ecological study for the Compensation Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) characterization of the 100 and 200 Areas. During the summer of 1993, field surveys were conducted and a map of vegetation communities in each area, including dominant species associations, was produced. The field surveys consisted of qualitative community delineations. The community delineations described were made by field reconnaissance and are qualitative in nature. The delineations were made by visually determining the dominant plant species or vegetation types and were based on the species most apparent at the time of inspection. Additionally, 38 transects were run in these plant communities to try to obtain a more accurate representation of the community. Because habitat disturbances from construction/operations activities continue to occur in these areas, users of this information should be cautious in applying these maps without a current ground survey. This work will complement large-scale habitat maps of the Hanford Site.},
doi = {10.2172/10124588},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 1994},
month = {Mon Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 1994}
}

Technical Report:

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  • Twenty-eight wells and boreholes in the 200 East Are% Hanford Site, Washington were monitored in 1999. The monitored facilities were past-practice liquid waste disposal facilities and consisted of six cribs and nineteen ''specific retention'' cribs and trenches. Monitoring consisted of spectral gamma-ray and neutron moisture logging. All data are included in Appendix B. The isotopes {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 154}Eu were identified on spectral gamma logs from boreholes monitoring the PUREX specific retention facilities; the isotopes {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 125}Sb, and {sup 154}Eu were identified on the logs from boreholes at themore » BC Controlled Area cribs and trenches; and {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 125}Sb were, identified on the logs from boreholes at the BX specific retention trenches. Three boreholes in the BC Controlled Area and one at the BX trenches had previous spectral gamma logs available for comparison with 1999 logs. Two of those logs showed that changes in the subsurface distribution of {sup 137}CS and/or {sup 60}Co had occurred since 1992. Although the changes are not great, they do point to continued movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. The logs obtained in 1999 create a larger baseline for comparison with future logs. Numerous historical gross gamma logs exist from most of the boreholes logged. Qualitative comparison of those logs with the 1999 logs show many substantial changes, most of which reflect the decay of deeper short-lived isotopes, such as {sup 106}Ru and {sup 125}Sb, and the much slower decay of shallower and longer-lived isotopes such as {sup 137}Cs. The radionuclides {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co have moved in two boreholes since 1992. Given the amount of movement and the half-lives of the isotopes, it is expected that they will decay to insignificant amounts before reaching groundwater. However, gamma ray logging cannot detect many of the contaminants of interest such as {sup 99}Tc, NO{sub 3}, or {sup 129}I, all of which can be highly mobile in the vadose zone and, for the radionuclides, have long half-lives.« less
  • Results of 1999 Spectral Gamma-Ray and Neutron Moisture Monitoring of Boreholes at Specific Retention Facilities in 200 East Area, Hanford Site, Washington
  • This decision document presents the selected interim remedial actions for portions of the USDOE Hanford 100 Area, Hanford Site, Benton County, Washington. The selected remedy is an interim action that involves removing hexavalent chromium from groundwater that discharges into the Columbia River. To intercept the chromium plumes, groundwater will be pumped from approximately 30 wells located along and inland from the river shoreline. The water will then be treated using an ion exchange treatment technology to remove chromium. The treated effluent will then be returned to the aquifer using injection wells located upgradient of the existing chromium plumes. The interimmore » action includes monitoring of the groundwater near the river and the effluent from the treatment system to determine system performance in meeting the remedial action objectives for protection of the Columbia River. The interim action also involves institutional controls to protect human health from groundwater contaminants.« less
  • This decision document changes components of the selected interim remedial action for the Hanford 100 Area radioactive liquid effluent disposal sites and clarifies the roles of revegetation or remediated sites with respect to the completion of the remedial actions. This amendment increases the scope of the selected remedy to include 34 additional sites in the 100 Area that received similar waste discharges and reduces the overall estimated cost for the remedial action to $194 million for 71 sites. This amendment also recognizes the results of the soil volume reduction treatability studies that indicate soil washing for volume reduction is notmore » cost effective. Therefore, this treatment step will no longer be retained as an option for the 100 Area radioactive liquid effluent disposal sites. This amendment also clarifies that revegetation of remediated wastes sites will be addressed using the guidance provided in the current Mitigation Action Plan.« less
  • The H-Area Outside Facilities are located in the 200-H Separations Area and are comprised of a number of processes, utilities, and services that support the separations function. Included are enriched uranium loadout, bulk chemical storage, water handling, acid recovery, general purpose evaporation, and segregated solvent facilities. In addition, services for water, electricity, and steam are provided. This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the H-Area Outside Facilities and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the SR Implementation Plan for DOE order 5481.1A. The primary purpose of the analysis was tomore » demonstrate that the facility can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations, to the environment, and to operating personnel. In this report, risks are defined as the expected frequencies of accidents, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequences in person-rem. Following the summary description of facility and operations is the site evaluation including the unique features of the H-Area Outside Facilities. The facility and process design are described in Chapter 3.0 and a description of operations and their impact is given in Chapter 4.0. The accident analysis in Chapter 5.0 is followed by a list of safety related structures and systems (Chapter 6.0) and a description of the Quality Assurance program (Chapter 7.0). The accident analysis in this report focuses on estimating the risk from accidents as a result of operation of the facilities. The operations were evaluated on the basis of three considerations: potential radiological hazards, potential chemical toxicity hazards, and potential conditions uniquely different from normal industrial practice.« less