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Title: Production of low-cost hydrogen. Final report, September 1989--August 1993

Abstract

Significant technical progress has been made over the last decade to develop efficient processes for upgrading coal resources to distillable hydrocarbons which may be used to displace petroleum-derived fuels. While several different direct coal liquefaction routes are under investigation, each of them have in common the need for large quantities of hydrogen to convert the aromatic coal matrix to liquid products in the normal distillation range, and for hydrotreating to improve liquid product quality. In fact, it has been estimated that the production, recovery, and efficient use of hydrogen accounts for over 50 percent of the capital cost of the liquefaction facility. For this reason, improved methods for producing low-cost hydrogen are essential to the operating economics of the liquefaction process. This Final Report provides an assessment of the application of the MTCI indirect gasification technology for the production of low-cost hydrogen from coal feedstocks. The MTCI gasification technology is unique in that it overcomes many of the problems and issues associated with direct and other indirectly heated coal gasification systems. Although the MTCI technology can be utilized for producing hydrogen from almost any carbonaceous feedstock (fossil, biomass and waste), this report presents the results of an experimental program sponsoredmore » by the Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center, to demonstrate the production of hydrogen from coal, mild gasification chars, and liquefaction bottoms.« less

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10123647
Report Number(s):
DOE/MC/26367-3622
ON: DE94000091; BR: AA8590000
DOE Contract Number:
AC21-89MC26367
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Jun 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; CHARS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; GASIFICATION; STEAM; PROCESS HEAT; HYDROGEN PRODUCTION; COST; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; COAL GASIFICATION; PULSE COMBUSTION; COAL LIQUEFACTION; RESIDUES; HEAT EXCHANGERS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; PROGRESS REPORT; SUBBITUMINOUS COAL; STEAM REFORMER PROCESSES; PARTIAL OXIDATION PROCESSES; OXYGEN PLANTS; PRESSURIZATION; 080107; 010404; 010405; HYDROGENATION AND LIQUEFACTION

Citation Formats

Not Available. Production of low-cost hydrogen. Final report, September 1989--August 1993. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.2172/10123647.
Not Available. Production of low-cost hydrogen. Final report, September 1989--August 1993. United States. doi:10.2172/10123647.
Not Available. 1993. "Production of low-cost hydrogen. Final report, September 1989--August 1993". United States. doi:10.2172/10123647. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10123647.
@article{osti_10123647,
title = {Production of low-cost hydrogen. Final report, September 1989--August 1993},
author = {Not Available},
abstractNote = {Significant technical progress has been made over the last decade to develop efficient processes for upgrading coal resources to distillable hydrocarbons which may be used to displace petroleum-derived fuels. While several different direct coal liquefaction routes are under investigation, each of them have in common the need for large quantities of hydrogen to convert the aromatic coal matrix to liquid products in the normal distillation range, and for hydrotreating to improve liquid product quality. In fact, it has been estimated that the production, recovery, and efficient use of hydrogen accounts for over 50 percent of the capital cost of the liquefaction facility. For this reason, improved methods for producing low-cost hydrogen are essential to the operating economics of the liquefaction process. This Final Report provides an assessment of the application of the MTCI indirect gasification technology for the production of low-cost hydrogen from coal feedstocks. The MTCI gasification technology is unique in that it overcomes many of the problems and issues associated with direct and other indirectly heated coal gasification systems. Although the MTCI technology can be utilized for producing hydrogen from almost any carbonaceous feedstock (fossil, biomass and waste), this report presents the results of an experimental program sponsored by the Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center, to demonstrate the production of hydrogen from coal, mild gasification chars, and liquefaction bottoms.},
doi = {10.2172/10123647},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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  • A principal objective of this work was to study the conversion of coal to C{sub 2} {minus} C{sub 4} hydrocarbons in a two-stage reactor system. Coal was converted to liquids at 440{degrees}C in a stirred batch autoclave using tetralin as the hydrogen donor solvent. The liquids produced were separated from the unreacted coal and ash by filtration. The liquids were then fed into a second stage fixed bed reactor containing sulfided Ni-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2{minus}}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. The liquids were hydrocracked on the dual functional catalyst giving high yields of C{sub 2} {minus} C{sub 4}. hydrocarbons. Themore » pressure was 1800 psi and the temperatures were in the range of 425 to 500{degrees}C. The kinetic parameters of the conversion of coal liquids to gases were determined. The activation energy was determined.« less