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Title: Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic vapor and particle deposition in coal-fired systems. Quarterly technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

Abstract

The goal of this research in the area of mineral matter transport is to dramatically advance the capability of making reliable, rational engineering predictions of the dynamics of net deposit growth for surfaces exposed to the particle-laden products of coal combustion. To accomplish this for a wide variety of combustor types, coal types, and operating conditions, this capability must be based on a quantitative understanding of each of the important mechanisms of mineral matter transport, as well as the nature of the interactions between these substances and the prevailing {open_quotes}fireside{close_quotes} surface of deposits. This level of understanding and predictive capability could be rapidly translated into very significant cost reductions for coal-fired equipment design, development and operation. It is also expected that this research activity will not only directly benefit the ash deposition R&D community --- but also generically closely related technologies of importance to DOE (e.g. hot-gas clean-up particulate solids handling,...). Indeed, all of these areas will be crucial to the success of the {open_quotes}Combustion 2000{close_quotes} program. In September 1990 DOE-PETC initiated at the Yale HTCRE Laboratory a systematic three-year research program directed toward providing engineers with the fundamentally-based design/optimization {open_quote}tools{close_quote} for economically predicting the dynamics of net deposit growth,more » and thermophysical properties of the resulting microparticulate deposits in coal-fired systems.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10122055
Report Number(s):
DOE/PC/90099-T14
ON: DE95007944; TRN: 95:002389
DOE Contract Number:  
FG22-90PC90099
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Mar 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 42 ENGINEERING; PARTICLES; DEPOSITION; COAL; COMBUSTION; COMBUSTORS; DEPOSITS; PROGRESS REPORT; ASHES; GROWTH; DESIGN; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; 014000; 200100; 421000; POWER PLANTS AND POWER GENERATION; COMBUSTION SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Rosner, D.E. Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic vapor and particle deposition in coal-fired systems. Quarterly technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Rosner, D.E. Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic vapor and particle deposition in coal-fired systems. Quarterly technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994. United States.
Rosner, D.E. Tue . "Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic vapor and particle deposition in coal-fired systems. Quarterly technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994". United States.
@article{osti_10122055,
title = {Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic vapor and particle deposition in coal-fired systems. Quarterly technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994},
author = {Rosner, D.E.},
abstractNote = {The goal of this research in the area of mineral matter transport is to dramatically advance the capability of making reliable, rational engineering predictions of the dynamics of net deposit growth for surfaces exposed to the particle-laden products of coal combustion. To accomplish this for a wide variety of combustor types, coal types, and operating conditions, this capability must be based on a quantitative understanding of each of the important mechanisms of mineral matter transport, as well as the nature of the interactions between these substances and the prevailing {open_quotes}fireside{close_quotes} surface of deposits. This level of understanding and predictive capability could be rapidly translated into very significant cost reductions for coal-fired equipment design, development and operation. It is also expected that this research activity will not only directly benefit the ash deposition R&D community --- but also generically closely related technologies of importance to DOE (e.g. hot-gas clean-up particulate solids handling,...). Indeed, all of these areas will be crucial to the success of the {open_quotes}Combustion 2000{close_quotes} program. In September 1990 DOE-PETC initiated at the Yale HTCRE Laboratory a systematic three-year research program directed toward providing engineers with the fundamentally-based design/optimization {open_quote}tools{close_quote} for economically predicting the dynamics of net deposit growth, and thermophysical properties of the resulting microparticulate deposits in coal-fired systems.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {3}
}

Technical Report:
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