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Title: Humain behavior

Abstract

Le Dr.Muriel James est ingénieur, conseiller/consultant dans plusieurs commissions (p.ex.justice criminelle au Japon) et universités et est l'auteur de nombreux livres (11) traduits dans plusieurs langues. Le plus connu de ses ouvrages est "Born to win". Dans son exposé elle se réfère à son livre "O.K.Boss" et parle d'un modèle spécifique du comportement humain et de ses qualités essentielles qui est la base de son travail.

Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
1012081
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
CERN
Language:
English

Citation Formats

None. Humain behavior. CERN: N. p., 2006. Web.
None. Humain behavior. CERN.
None. Thu . "Humain behavior". CERN. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1012081.
@article{osti_1012081,
title = {Humain behavior},
author = {None},
abstractNote = {Le Dr.Muriel James est ingénieur, conseiller/consultant dans plusieurs commissions (p.ex.justice criminelle au Japon) et universités et est l'auteur de nombreux livres (11) traduits dans plusieurs langues. Le plus connu de ses ouvrages est "Born to win". Dans son exposé elle se réfère à son livre "O.K.Boss" et parle d'un modèle spécifique du comportement humain et de ses qualités essentielles qui est la base de son travail.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {CERN},
year = {Thu May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2006},
month = {Thu May 04 00:00:00 EDT 2006}
}
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