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Title: GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

Abstract

Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1011708
Report Number(s):
SAND2011-1767
TRN: US201109%%735
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ALGORITHMS; DESIGN; DETECTION; GEOMETRY; IMPLEMENTATION; RADAR; RADIAL VELOCITY; TARGETS; VELOCITY

Citation Formats

Richards, John Alfred. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.2172/1011708.
Richards, John Alfred. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.. United States. doi:10.2172/1011708.
Richards, John Alfred. 2011. "GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.". United States. doi:10.2172/1011708. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1011708.
@article{osti_1011708,
title = {GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.},
author = {Richards, John Alfred},
abstractNote = {Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.},
doi = {10.2172/1011708},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month = 4
}

Technical Report:

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