skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Air-depolyable geophysics package

Abstract

We are using Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) diverse expertise to develop a geophysical monitoring system that can survive being dropped into place by a helicopter or airplane. Such an air-deployable system could significantly decrease the time and effort needed to set up such instruments in remote locations following a major earthquake or volcanic eruption. Most currently available geophysical monitoring and survey systems, such as seismic monitoring stations, use sensitive, fragile instrumentation that requires personnel trained and experienced in data acquisition and field setup. Rapid deployment of such equipment can be difficult or impossible. Recent developments in low-power electronics, new materials, and sensors that are resistant to severe impacts have made it possible to develop low-cost geophysical monitoring packages for rapid deployment missions. Our strategy was to focus on low-cost battery-powered systems that would have a relatively long (several months) operational lifetime. We concentrated on the conceptual design and engineering of a single-component seismic system that could survive an air-deployment into an earth material, such as alluvium. Actual implementation of such a system is a goal of future work on this concept. For this project, we drew on LLNL`s Earth Sciences Department, Radio Shop, Plastics Shop, and Weapons Program. Themore » military has had several programs to develop air-deployed and cannon-deployed seismometers. Recently, a sonobuoy manufacturer has offered an air-deployable geophone designed to make relatively soft landings.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10116908
Report Number(s):
UCRL-ID-115370
ON: DE94005651
DOE Contract Number:  
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Nov 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 42 ENGINEERING; MONITORS; IMPACT TESTS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; ENCAPSULATION; DESIGN; 440800; 420500; MISCELLANEOUS INSTRUMENTATION; MATERIALS TESTING

Citation Formats

Hunter, S L, and Harben, P E. Air-depolyable geophysics package. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.2172/10116908.
Hunter, S L, & Harben, P E. Air-depolyable geophysics package. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/10116908
Hunter, S L, and Harben, P E. Mon . "Air-depolyable geophysics package". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/10116908. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10116908.
@article{osti_10116908,
title = {Air-depolyable geophysics package},
author = {Hunter, S L and Harben, P E},
abstractNote = {We are using Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) diverse expertise to develop a geophysical monitoring system that can survive being dropped into place by a helicopter or airplane. Such an air-deployable system could significantly decrease the time and effort needed to set up such instruments in remote locations following a major earthquake or volcanic eruption. Most currently available geophysical monitoring and survey systems, such as seismic monitoring stations, use sensitive, fragile instrumentation that requires personnel trained and experienced in data acquisition and field setup. Rapid deployment of such equipment can be difficult or impossible. Recent developments in low-power electronics, new materials, and sensors that are resistant to severe impacts have made it possible to develop low-cost geophysical monitoring packages for rapid deployment missions. Our strategy was to focus on low-cost battery-powered systems that would have a relatively long (several months) operational lifetime. We concentrated on the conceptual design and engineering of a single-component seismic system that could survive an air-deployment into an earth material, such as alluvium. Actual implementation of such a system is a goal of future work on this concept. For this project, we drew on LLNL`s Earth Sciences Department, Radio Shop, Plastics Shop, and Weapons Program. The military has had several programs to develop air-deployed and cannon-deployed seismometers. Recently, a sonobuoy manufacturer has offered an air-deployable geophone designed to make relatively soft landings.},
doi = {10.2172/10116908},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/10116908}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1993},
month = {11}
}