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Title: Methods of valuing air pollution and estimated monetary values of air pollutants in various U.S. regions

Abstract

Air pollutant emission values are used to determine the social costs of various technologies that cause air pollution and to estimate the benefits of emission control technologies. In this report, the authors present two methods of estimating air pollutant emission values--the damage value method and the control cost method--and review 15 recent studies in which these methods were employed to estimate emission values. The reviewed studies derived emission values for only a limited number of areas; emission value estimates are needed for other US regions. Using the emission values estimated in the reviewed studies, they establish regression relationships between emission values, air pollutant concentrations, and total population exposed, and apply the established relationships to 17 US metropolitan areas to estimate damage-based and control-cost-based emission values for reactive organic gases, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter measuring less than 10 microns, sulfur oxides, and carbon monoxide in these areas. Their estimates show significant variations in emission values across the 17 regions.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Center for Transportation Research
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10114725
Report Number(s):
ANL/ESD-26
ON: DE95006854;; TRN: AHC29507%%95
DOE Contract Number:  
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Dec 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION; ECONOMIC IMPACT; URBAN AREAS; POLLUTION CONTROL EQUIPMENT; COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS; ELECTRIC-POWERED VEHICLES; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; POLLUTANTS; COMPILED DATA; AIR POLLUTION MONITORING; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN OXIDES; PARTICULATES; SULFUR OXIDES; CARBON MONOXIDE; COST ESTIMATION; 290300; 540120; 290201; ENVIRONMENT, HEALTH, AND SAFETY; CHEMICALS MONITORING AND TRANSPORT; ECONOMICS

Citation Formats

Wang, M Q, Santini, D J, and Warinner, S A. Methods of valuing air pollution and estimated monetary values of air pollutants in various U.S. regions. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.2172/10114725.
Wang, M Q, Santini, D J, & Warinner, S A. Methods of valuing air pollution and estimated monetary values of air pollutants in various U.S. regions. United States. doi:10.2172/10114725.
Wang, M Q, Santini, D J, and Warinner, S A. Thu . "Methods of valuing air pollution and estimated monetary values of air pollutants in various U.S. regions". United States. doi:10.2172/10114725. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10114725.
@article{osti_10114725,
title = {Methods of valuing air pollution and estimated monetary values of air pollutants in various U.S. regions},
author = {Wang, M Q and Santini, D J and Warinner, S A},
abstractNote = {Air pollutant emission values are used to determine the social costs of various technologies that cause air pollution and to estimate the benefits of emission control technologies. In this report, the authors present two methods of estimating air pollutant emission values--the damage value method and the control cost method--and review 15 recent studies in which these methods were employed to estimate emission values. The reviewed studies derived emission values for only a limited number of areas; emission value estimates are needed for other US regions. Using the emission values estimated in the reviewed studies, they establish regression relationships between emission values, air pollutant concentrations, and total population exposed, and apply the established relationships to 17 US metropolitan areas to estimate damage-based and control-cost-based emission values for reactive organic gases, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter measuring less than 10 microns, sulfur oxides, and carbon monoxide in these areas. Their estimates show significant variations in emission values across the 17 regions.},
doi = {10.2172/10114725},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1994},
month = {12}
}