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Title: Organic microporous materials and their interactions with different gases

Abstract

This work explored the interactions of various organic microporous materials with different gases. The authors were attempting to make substances that could separate gases through differential adsorption or store gases at reduced pressures. They synthesized xerogels that were highly crosslinked, allowing relatively large amounts of micro- and mesopores within the organic polymers. The monomers were polymerized in a solvent which was removed forming xerogels. Then exhaustive drying was performed to yield the tested microporous materials. The xerogels were exposed to four gases to observe their gas adsorption affinities (methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and isobutane). For each microporous polymer the authors measured BET surface area, nitrogen isotherm, bulk density, pycnometric density, and equilibrium gas adsorption. Pore volume and pore size distribution were also calculated for some samples. Adsorption characteristics paralleled, but were not directly proportional to surface area or pore size distribution changes. Changes in adsorption magnitude and selectivity have been made through various formulations and derivatization. Increasing polarity showed increased affinities towards carbon dioxide, slightly increased affinities towards isobutane, and unchanged affinities towards methane and hydrogen. These materials could adsorb significant amounts of gas; about half the amount of some commercial carbons. Considering the minimal processing involved in their synthesis,more » these materials could be cost effective replacements for carbons in low-cost applications where high adsorption efficiencies are not a priority.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Chemistry Dept.
  2. Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Organic Materials Processing Dept.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Research, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10112716
Report Number(s):
SAND-96-8240
ON: TI97020624; TRN: AHC29908%%31
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Apr 1997
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 03 NATURAL GAS; 08 HYDROGEN; ORGANIC POLYMERS; CHEMICAL PREPARATION; SORPTIVE PROPERTIES; METHANE; CARBON DIOXIDE; HYDROGEN; 2-METHYLPROPANE; ADSORPTION; SEPARATION PROCESSES; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; 320302; 030400; 080100; MATERIALS; PRODUCTS AND BY-PRODUCTS; PRODUCTION

Citation Formats

Shepodd, T.J., Miller, D.L., and Lagasse, R.R. Organic microporous materials and their interactions with different gases. United States: N. p., 1997. Web.
Shepodd, T.J., Miller, D.L., & Lagasse, R.R. Organic microporous materials and their interactions with different gases. United States.
Shepodd, T.J., Miller, D.L., and Lagasse, R.R. Tue . "Organic microporous materials and their interactions with different gases". United States.
@article{osti_10112716,
title = {Organic microporous materials and their interactions with different gases},
author = {Shepodd, T.J. and Miller, D.L. and Lagasse, R.R.},
abstractNote = {This work explored the interactions of various organic microporous materials with different gases. The authors were attempting to make substances that could separate gases through differential adsorption or store gases at reduced pressures. They synthesized xerogels that were highly crosslinked, allowing relatively large amounts of micro- and mesopores within the organic polymers. The monomers were polymerized in a solvent which was removed forming xerogels. Then exhaustive drying was performed to yield the tested microporous materials. The xerogels were exposed to four gases to observe their gas adsorption affinities (methane, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and isobutane). For each microporous polymer the authors measured BET surface area, nitrogen isotherm, bulk density, pycnometric density, and equilibrium gas adsorption. Pore volume and pore size distribution were also calculated for some samples. Adsorption characteristics paralleled, but were not directly proportional to surface area or pore size distribution changes. Changes in adsorption magnitude and selectivity have been made through various formulations and derivatization. Increasing polarity showed increased affinities towards carbon dioxide, slightly increased affinities towards isobutane, and unchanged affinities towards methane and hydrogen. These materials could adsorb significant amounts of gas; about half the amount of some commercial carbons. Considering the minimal processing involved in their synthesis, these materials could be cost effective replacements for carbons in low-cost applications where high adsorption efficiencies are not a priority.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {4}
}

Technical Report:
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