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Title: Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration

Abstract

Owing to their exceptional stiffness and strength1 4, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have long been considered to be an ideal reinforcement for light-weight, high-strength, and high-temperature-resistant ceramic matrix composites (CMCs)5 10. However, the research and development in CNT-reinforced CMCs have been greatly hindered due to the challenges related to manufacturing including poor dispersion, damages during dispersion, surface modification, densification and sintering, weak tube/matrix interfaces, and agglomeration of tubes at the matrix grain boundaries5,11. Here we report the fabrication of high-quality aligned CNT/SiC composites by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), a technique that is being widely used to fabricate commercial continuous-filament CMCs12 15. Using the CVI technique most of the challenges previously encountered in the fabrication of CNT composites were readily overcome. Nanotube pullouts, an important toughening mechanism for CMCs, were consistently observed on all fractured CNT/SiC samples. Indeed, three-point bending tests conducted on individual CNT/SiC nanowires (diameters: 50 200 nm) using an atomic force microscope show that the CNT-reinforced SiC nanowires are about an order of magnitude tougher than the bulk SiC. The tube/matrix interface is so intimate and the SiC matrix is so dense that a ~50-nm-thick SiC coating can effectively protect the inside nanotubes from being oxidized at 1600 Cmore » in air. The CVI method may be extended to produce nanotube composites from a variety of matrix« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [3]
  1. University of Georgia, Athens, GA
  2. University of South Carolina, Columbia
  3. ORNL
  4. Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an, China
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shared Research Equipment Collaborative Research Center
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1010988
DOE Contract Number:  
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Carbon
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 49; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 0008-6223
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; AGGLOMERATION; AIR; BENDING; CARBON; CERAMICS; COATINGS; FABRICATION; FLEXIBILITY; GRAIN BOUNDARIES; MANUFACTURING; MICROSCOPES; NANOTUBES; SILICON CARBIDES; SINTERING; CNT composites; mechanical properties

Citation Formats

Gu, Zhan Jun, Yang, Ying Chao, Li, Kai Yuan, Tao, Xin Yong, Eres, Gyula, Howe, Jane Y, Zhang, Li Tong, Li, Xiao Dong, and Pan, Zhengwei. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1016/j.carbon.2011.02.016.
Gu, Zhan Jun, Yang, Ying Chao, Li, Kai Yuan, Tao, Xin Yong, Eres, Gyula, Howe, Jane Y, Zhang, Li Tong, Li, Xiao Dong, & Pan, Zhengwei. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration. United States. doi:10.1016/j.carbon.2011.02.016.
Gu, Zhan Jun, Yang, Ying Chao, Li, Kai Yuan, Tao, Xin Yong, Eres, Gyula, Howe, Jane Y, Zhang, Li Tong, Li, Xiao Dong, and Pan, Zhengwei. Sat . "Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration". United States. doi:10.1016/j.carbon.2011.02.016.
@article{osti_1010988,
title = {Aligned Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration},
author = {Gu, Zhan Jun and Yang, Ying Chao and Li, Kai Yuan and Tao, Xin Yong and Eres, Gyula and Howe, Jane Y and Zhang, Li Tong and Li, Xiao Dong and Pan, Zhengwei},
abstractNote = {Owing to their exceptional stiffness and strength1 4, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have long been considered to be an ideal reinforcement for light-weight, high-strength, and high-temperature-resistant ceramic matrix composites (CMCs)5 10. However, the research and development in CNT-reinforced CMCs have been greatly hindered due to the challenges related to manufacturing including poor dispersion, damages during dispersion, surface modification, densification and sintering, weak tube/matrix interfaces, and agglomeration of tubes at the matrix grain boundaries5,11. Here we report the fabrication of high-quality aligned CNT/SiC composites by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), a technique that is being widely used to fabricate commercial continuous-filament CMCs12 15. Using the CVI technique most of the challenges previously encountered in the fabrication of CNT composites were readily overcome. Nanotube pullouts, an important toughening mechanism for CMCs, were consistently observed on all fractured CNT/SiC samples. Indeed, three-point bending tests conducted on individual CNT/SiC nanowires (diameters: 50 200 nm) using an atomic force microscope show that the CNT-reinforced SiC nanowires are about an order of magnitude tougher than the bulk SiC. The tube/matrix interface is so intimate and the SiC matrix is so dense that a ~50-nm-thick SiC coating can effectively protect the inside nanotubes from being oxidized at 1600 C in air. The CVI method may be extended to produce nanotube composites from a variety of matrix},
doi = {10.1016/j.carbon.2011.02.016},
journal = {Carbon},
issn = {0008-6223},
number = 7,
volume = 49,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {1}
}