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Title: Parametric design using IGRIP

Abstract

The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford site near Richland, Washington is being cleaned up after 50 years of nuclear materials production. One of the most serious problems at the site is the waste stored in single-shell underground storage tanks. There are 149 of these tanks containing the spent fuel residue remaining after the fuel is dissolved in acid and the desired materials (primarily plutonium and uranium) are separated out. The tanks are upright cylinders 75 ft. in diameter with domed tops. They are made of reinforced concrete, have steel liners, and each tank is buried under 7--12 ft. of overburden. The tanks are up to 40-ft. high, and have capacities of 500,000, 750,000, or 1,000,000 gallons of waste. As many as one-third of these tanks are known or suspected to leak. The waste form contained in the tanks varies in consistency from liquid supernatant to peanut-butter-like gels and sludges to hard salt cake (perhaps as hard as low-grade concrete). The current waste retrieval plan is to insert a large long-reach manipulator through a hole cut in the top of the tank, and use a variety of end-effectors to mobilize the waste and remove it from the tank. PNL has, withmore » the assistance of Deneb robotics employees, developed a means of using the IGRIP code to perform parametric design of mechanical systems. This method requires no modifications to the IGRIP code, and all design data are stored in the IGRIP workcell. The method is presented in the context of development of a passive articulated mechanism that is used to deliver down-arm services to a gantry robot. The method is completely general, however, and could be used to design a fully articulated manipulator. Briefly, the method involves using IGCALC expressions to control manipulator joint angles, and IGCALC variables to allow user control of link lengths and offsets. This paper presents the method in detail, with examples drawn from PNL`s experience with the gantry robot service-providing mechanism.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States). Applied Physics Center
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10109162
Report Number(s):
PNL-SA-25050; CONF-9410231-2
ON: DE95004937;; TRN: AHC29507%%128
DOE Contract Number:  
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 8. Deneb user group meeting,Detroit, MI (United States),10-14 Oct 1994; Other Information: PBD: Oct 1994
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 42 ENGINEERING; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; MANIPULATORS; COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN; HANFORD RESERVATION; STORAGE FACILITIES; TANKS; WASTE RETRIEVAL; RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS; REMEDIAL ACTION; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; ROBOTS; I CODES; PARAMETRIC ANALYSIS; UNDERGROUND STORAGE; RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE; 052002; 420203; 054000; WASTE DISPOSAL AND STORAGE; HANDLING EQUIPMENT AND PROCEDURES; HEALTH AND SAFETY

Citation Formats

Baker, C. Parametric design using IGRIP. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Baker, C. Parametric design using IGRIP. United States.
Baker, C. Sat . "Parametric design using IGRIP". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10109162.
@article{osti_10109162,
title = {Parametric design using IGRIP},
author = {Baker, C.},
abstractNote = {The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford site near Richland, Washington is being cleaned up after 50 years of nuclear materials production. One of the most serious problems at the site is the waste stored in single-shell underground storage tanks. There are 149 of these tanks containing the spent fuel residue remaining after the fuel is dissolved in acid and the desired materials (primarily plutonium and uranium) are separated out. The tanks are upright cylinders 75 ft. in diameter with domed tops. They are made of reinforced concrete, have steel liners, and each tank is buried under 7--12 ft. of overburden. The tanks are up to 40-ft. high, and have capacities of 500,000, 750,000, or 1,000,000 gallons of waste. As many as one-third of these tanks are known or suspected to leak. The waste form contained in the tanks varies in consistency from liquid supernatant to peanut-butter-like gels and sludges to hard salt cake (perhaps as hard as low-grade concrete). The current waste retrieval plan is to insert a large long-reach manipulator through a hole cut in the top of the tank, and use a variety of end-effectors to mobilize the waste and remove it from the tank. PNL has, with the assistance of Deneb robotics employees, developed a means of using the IGRIP code to perform parametric design of mechanical systems. This method requires no modifications to the IGRIP code, and all design data are stored in the IGRIP workcell. The method is presented in the context of development of a passive articulated mechanism that is used to deliver down-arm services to a gantry robot. The method is completely general, however, and could be used to design a fully articulated manipulator. Briefly, the method involves using IGCALC expressions to control manipulator joint angles, and IGCALC variables to allow user control of link lengths and offsets. This paper presents the method in detail, with examples drawn from PNL`s experience with the gantry robot service-providing mechanism.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994},
month = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994}
}

Conference:
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