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Title: Nanotechnology in Li-ion Batteries

Abstract

This is the second of three talks on nanostructures for li-ion batteries. The talks provide an up-to-date review of the issues and challenges facing Li-ion battery research with special focus on how nanostructures/ nanotechnology are being applied to this field. Novel materials reported as prospective candidates for anode, cathode and electrolyte will be summarized. The expected role of nanostructures in improving the performance of Li-ion batteries and the actual pros and cons of using such structures in this device will be addressed. Electrochemical experiments used to study Li-ion batteries will also be discussed. This includes the introduction to the standard experimental set-up and how experimental data (from charge-discharge experiments, cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, etc) are interpreted.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (University of Florida, Martin Research Group)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SNL (Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, NM, and Livermore, CA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1010348
Report Number(s):
SAND-2010-4339P
TRN: US201122%%14
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94-AL85000
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Resource Relation:
Conference: Nanostructures for Li-ion Batteries, Parts 1, 2, and 3, Sandia National Laboratories, March 2011
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; CATHODES; ELECTROLYTES; IMPEDANCE; NANOSTRUCTURES; PERFORMANCE; SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES; SPECTROSCOPY; LITHIUM IONS; ELECTRIC BATTERIES

Citation Formats

Mukaibo, Hitomi. Nanotechnology in Li-ion Batteries. United States: N. p., 2010. Web.
Mukaibo, Hitomi. Nanotechnology in Li-ion Batteries. United States.
Mukaibo, Hitomi. 2010. "Nanotechnology in Li-ion Batteries". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1010348.
@article{osti_1010348,
title = {Nanotechnology in Li-ion Batteries},
author = {Mukaibo, Hitomi},
abstractNote = {This is the second of three talks on nanostructures for li-ion batteries. The talks provide an up-to-date review of the issues and challenges facing Li-ion battery research with special focus on how nanostructures/ nanotechnology are being applied to this field. Novel materials reported as prospective candidates for anode, cathode and electrolyte will be summarized. The expected role of nanostructures in improving the performance of Li-ion batteries and the actual pros and cons of using such structures in this device will be addressed. Electrochemical experiments used to study Li-ion batteries will also be discussed. This includes the introduction to the standard experimental set-up and how experimental data (from charge-discharge experiments, cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, etc) are interpreted.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2010,
month = 6
}
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