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Title: Discrimination and quantification of contamination and implanted solar wind in Genesis collector shards using grazing incidence synchrotron x-ray techniqies: Initial results

Abstract

Grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence is a non-destructive technique that can differentiate the embedded solar wind component from surface contamination and collector background in the Genesis shards. Initial solar Fe abundance in D30554 is 8 x 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}. Accurate knowledge of the composition of the Sun provides a baseline, which allows an understanding of how the solar system has evolved over time and how solar processes and solar wind mechanics behave. Unfortunately, the errors in photospheric abundances are too large for many planetary science problems and this hampers our understanding of these different processes. Analyses of solar wind implanted in meteorites or lunar soils have provided more precise data but alteration processes on these bodies may complicate such information. In response to this need for pristine solar wind samples, NASA developed and launched the Genesis Probe. Unfortunately, the probe smashed into the Utah desert shattering the 300 collector plates into 15,000+ pieces all of which are now coated in a both a fine terrestrial dust and Si and Ge powder from the disrupted collectors themselves. The solar wind penetration depth is 100-200 nm and the superposed contamination layers are typically 40-50 nm. Stringent cleaning regimes have the potential of removingmore » the solar wind itself. The best solution is to have sufficient spatial resolution to separately analyze the surface contamination and penetrated solar wind. To that end, three Genesis collector array shards and their appropriate flight spares were characterized via grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence and x-ray reflectivity. The goals were (1) to evaluate the various cleaning methods used to eliminate contamination, (2) to identify the collector substrates most suited for this technique, (3) to determine whether the solar wind signature could be deconvolved from the collector background signature, and (4) to measure the relative abundances of Ca to Ge in the embedded solar wind.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. (CIT)
  2. (
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1008980
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVII;March 13-17, 2006;Houston, Texas
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ABUNDANCE; CLEANING; CONTAMINATION; DUSTS; FLUORESCENCE; FRAGMENTATION; METEORITES; NASA; ORIGIN; PENETRATION DEPTH; PLATES; PROBES; REFLECTIVITY; SOILS; SOLAR SYSTEM; SOLAR WIND; SPATIAL RESOLUTION; SUBSTRATES; SURFACE CONTAMINATION; SYNCHROTRONS

Citation Formats

Kitts, K., Sutton, S., Eng, P., Ghose, S., Burnett, D., NIU), and UC). Discrimination and quantification of contamination and implanted solar wind in Genesis collector shards using grazing incidence synchrotron x-ray techniqies: Initial results. United States: N. p., 2006. Web.
Kitts, K., Sutton, S., Eng, P., Ghose, S., Burnett, D., NIU), & UC). Discrimination and quantification of contamination and implanted solar wind in Genesis collector shards using grazing incidence synchrotron x-ray techniqies: Initial results. United States.
Kitts, K., Sutton, S., Eng, P., Ghose, S., Burnett, D., NIU), and UC). Wed . "Discrimination and quantification of contamination and implanted solar wind in Genesis collector shards using grazing incidence synchrotron x-ray techniqies: Initial results". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1008980,
title = {Discrimination and quantification of contamination and implanted solar wind in Genesis collector shards using grazing incidence synchrotron x-ray techniqies: Initial results},
author = {Kitts, K. and Sutton, S. and Eng, P. and Ghose, S. and Burnett, D. and NIU) and UC)},
abstractNote = {Grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence is a non-destructive technique that can differentiate the embedded solar wind component from surface contamination and collector background in the Genesis shards. Initial solar Fe abundance in D30554 is 8 x 10{sup 12}/cm{sup 2}. Accurate knowledge of the composition of the Sun provides a baseline, which allows an understanding of how the solar system has evolved over time and how solar processes and solar wind mechanics behave. Unfortunately, the errors in photospheric abundances are too large for many planetary science problems and this hampers our understanding of these different processes. Analyses of solar wind implanted in meteorites or lunar soils have provided more precise data but alteration processes on these bodies may complicate such information. In response to this need for pristine solar wind samples, NASA developed and launched the Genesis Probe. Unfortunately, the probe smashed into the Utah desert shattering the 300 collector plates into 15,000+ pieces all of which are now coated in a both a fine terrestrial dust and Si and Ge powder from the disrupted collectors themselves. The solar wind penetration depth is 100-200 nm and the superposed contamination layers are typically 40-50 nm. Stringent cleaning regimes have the potential of removing the solar wind itself. The best solution is to have sufficient spatial resolution to separately analyze the surface contamination and penetrated solar wind. To that end, three Genesis collector array shards and their appropriate flight spares were characterized via grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence and x-ray reflectivity. The goals were (1) to evaluate the various cleaning methods used to eliminate contamination, (2) to identify the collector substrates most suited for this technique, (3) to determine whether the solar wind signature could be deconvolved from the collector background signature, and (4) to measure the relative abundances of Ca to Ge in the embedded solar wind.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Dec 13 00:00:00 EST 2006},
month = {Wed Dec 13 00:00:00 EST 2006}
}

Conference:
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  • Accurate knowledge of the composition of the Sun provides a baseline, which allows an understanding of how the solar system has evolved over time and how solar processes and solar wind mechanics behave. Unfortunately, the errors in photospheric abundances are too large for many planetary science problems and this hampers our understanding of these different processes. Analyses of solar wind implanted in meteorites or lunar soils have provided more precise data [e.g. 1 and references therein] but the extent to which alteration processes on these bodies complicate such information is only now being determined. Therefore, in order to obtain pristinemore » solar wind samples, NASA developed and launched the Genesis Discovery Mission. Unfortunately, the probe crash-landed shattering the 300 collector plates into 15,000+ pieces complicating the analysis and necessitating the development of new analytical techniques and equipment. Thus, shards from the Genesis collector array and their appropriate flight spares are currently being characterized via grazing-incidence synchrotron x-ray techniques at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The goals are (1) determine solar wind fluences of the elements Ca-Ge by grazing-incidence angle-resolved x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and x-ray reflectivity, (2) improve data reduction via the development of XRF spectral deconvolution routines and develop modeling algorithms for reflectivity and fluorescence yield analysis in order to determine element specific depth profiles from which absolute concentration may be extracted and (3) designing and developing a new multi-element silicon multi-channel (SMCD) detector system. These improvements will increase our sensitivity by a factor of three or more, reduce measurement time at a given sensitivity to one-eighth and the minimum detection limit would be reduced by a factor of 3 to {approx}3 x 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2}.« less
  • In this paper, X-ray standing wave fluorescence yield depth profiling was used to determine the solar wind implanted Fe and Ni fluences in a silicon-on-sapphire (SoS) Genesis collector (60326). An internal reference standardization method was developed based on fluorescence from Si and Al in the collector materials. Measured Fe fluence agreed well with that measured previously by us on a sapphire collector (50722) as well as SIMS results by Jurewicz et al. Measured Ni fluence was higher than expected by a factor of two; neither instrumental errors nor solar wind fractionation effects are considered significant perturbations to this value. Impuritymore » Ni within the epitaxial Si layer, if present, could explain the high Ni fluences and therefore needs further investigation. As they stand, these results are consistent with minor temporally-variable Fe and Ni fractionation on the timescale of a year.« less
  • NASA launched the Genesis return mission to obtain pristine solar wind samples in order to better understand solar wind mechanics, solar physics, and solar system evolution. Unfortunately, the probe crash-landed shattering the collector plates necessitating the application of a grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence technique. This nondestructive methodology differentiates the terrestrial contamination from the low concentration implanted solar wind. Using this technique, the elemental depth distribution is obtained resulting in the determination of absolute solar wind elemental abundance. We describe this application and present the solar wind Fe concentration determination as an example.